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TOWN OF PITTSFIELD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1984 
ANNUAL REPORT 




IWYEKSLLT OP NEW HAMPSm i 
LIBRARY 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



of the 



TOWN OEF" I GERS 



rittseield 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



E o ar- the Year e n ci d_ ri. c^j 
DEO EMBER 3 :L , 3_ r=* S ** 



PRINTED BY PITT5FIELD PRINTING TYPESET BY THE SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 



INDEX 



Balance Sheet 15 

Bonded Debt, Statement of 12 

Budget, 1965 9 

Carpenter Memorial Library Report 34 

Community Developement Report 37 

Comparative Statement o± Expenditures 16 

Compenaation Schedule 33 

Current Use Report 12 

Financial Report, 1964 25 

Fire Department Report 38 

Fire Department Roster 39 

Inventory of Town 13 

Minutes of the 1964 Town Meeting 43 

Police Eiepartment Report 40 

Schedule of Town Property 13 

SCHOOL DISTRICT REPORT 57 

Selectmen's Report 41 

Solid Waste Facility 18 

Tax Collector's Report 23 

Tax Rate Information 13 

Town Clerk Report 42 

Town Offices 3 

Treasurer's Report 14 

Trustees Report 20 
Vital Statistics 42,51 

Warrant - 1965 5 



- 2 - 



TOWN OFFICES 



MODERATOR 

Henry F. Stapleton 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECKLIST 
Frances A. Marston 

Roberta Maxfield 
Arnold Welle 



SELECTMEN 
Floyd J. Caraon 
Saverlo Buattl 
Leo W. Fraaer, Jr 



TRUSTEES OF CARPENTER LIBRARY 

Sybil C. Peaae 

Agnes I. Ring 

Ralph Van Horn 



BOARD OF FIRE WARDS 

Frederick T. Haat 

Dana R. Flandera 

Douglaa N. Stevena 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN 
Frederick T. Haat 



TOWN TREASURER 
Sandra M. Marat on 



ROAD AGENT 
Cordon W. Foaa 



TOWN CLERK - TAX COLLECTOR 
Elizabeth A. Haat 



CHIEF OF POLICE 
David B. Greenwood, Sr. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Ogden H. Boyd, Sr. 
George E. Holloway 
John H. Perkins 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 

George L. Gorman 

Janes E. Smith 

Edward G. Blaia 

Eddie Watson 



AUDITORS 

Teresa L. Fiandera 
Marsha A. DuMont 
Stephen J. Adams 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Frederick T. ureenhalge, Esquire 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
Phillip G. Brooka 



ADMINISTRATIVE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Nancy E. Pethic 

Martha J. Donovan 

William S. Freeae 

William P. Fraser 

Willard Biahop 



REPRESENTATIVES TO THE GENERAL COURT 
Jamea H. Pannell, Canterbury 
Llnwood A. Rogers, Canterbury 
Leo W. Fraaer, Jr., Pittafield 



SEWER COMMITTEE 

Jon F. Lebrun 

Robert E. Foaa 

Maurice H. Wells 



- 3 - 



BUDGET COMMITTEE 
Cheater T. Franeia 
Carol L. Grainger 
Kenneth E. Garland 
David J. Pollard 
Wilbur S. Maxfield 
Roland A. Drolet 
Elaie M. Morse 
Shiela Fries 
Barbara M. Clark 
Marsha A. DuMont 
James P. Ryan 
Stephen J. Adams 
John E. Geneat, Sr 
Floyd J. Carson 



TERM EXPIRES 
1385 
1985 
1385 
1385 
1985 
1386 
1986 
1366 
1987 
1387 
1387 
1387 
School Board Representative 
Board o* Selectmen Representative 



PLANNING BOARD 
Steven A. Davis 
Willis E. Pethic 
John W. Barto 
Daniel S. Coolidge 
Arnold L. Wells 
Leo W. Fraser, Jr. 



TERM EXPIRES 
3/85 
3/85 
3/86 
3/86 
Alternate 
Board of Selectmen Representative 



- 4 - 



WARRANT 

TOWN OF PITTSFIELD 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Pittsfield, the County of Merrimack in 
aaid State, qualified to vote in Town affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the VFW, located on Ela Street, in aaid 
Pittafield on Tuesday, the TWELFTH day of MARCH, i9a&, at TEN of the clock in the 
forenoon and at the GREENLEAF AUDITORIUM at EIGHT of the clock in the evening to 
act upon the following subjects: 

*5II?!?§_**± To choose all necessary Town Officers for the year ensueing. 
(Polls shall open at 10:00 AM and not close before 6:00 PM) 

A?II?t§_*?i To flee if tne Town wil1 vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to apply for, accept and expend money from the State, Federal or any other 
Governmental unit or private source which becomes available during the year in 
accordance with the provisions set forth in RSA 31:9S-b. Such authorization to 
include the purchase of property with the aforementioned funds. 

*?I*?k§_*§.i To fiee xi tne Town wiii vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell, 
rent, or lease any or all property acquired by Tax Collector's Deeds, or any 
other source, and to administer said property as they deem in the beat interests 
of the Town. 

ARTICLE_#4 i To see if the Town will vote to authorize prepayment of property 
taxes and to authorize the Tax Collector to accept prepayments as provided by RSA 
80:52-a. 

ARTICLE #5 ± To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 

borrow money in anticipation of 1965 taxes, the same to be repaid with that year 
levy. 

*!?1I£!=§_*§.l To flee if tne Town wil1 vote to appropriate the sum of $1000 for 
the purpose of further developement of the east side of the Forest B. Argue 
Memorial Pool as a family picnic/recreation area. 

ARTICLE #7^ To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and authorize the 

withdrawal from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds for use as set-offs againat 
budgeted appropriations for the following specific purposes and in amounts 
indicated herewith or take any action hereon: 

Police Cruiser 3 6,000 

Highway Sander 3 7,200 

Salt Shed 3 5,000 

Capital Reaerve -Highway Equipment 310,000 
Capital Reserve -Fire Apparatus 315,000 



$43,200 



*BII?*:i_*§.i " r ° see xi tne Town wlli vote to authorize the establishment of a 
Capital Reaerve Fund for fire apparatua in the amount of 515,000 contingent upon 
the approval of the use of Revenue Sharing Funds. 



- 5 - 



ARTICLE #9^ To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and authorise the 

withdrawal from established capital reserve funds for use as set-offs against 
budgeted appropriations for the following specific purposes and in amounts 
indicated herewith: 

Police Cruiser S 6,000 

Municipal Offices Planning S14.000 



S 20. 000 



^5TI?t§_*19i To see i£ tne Town wlii vote to raise and appropriate the sums 
of money recommended by the Budget Committee to defray Town expenses for the year 
ensuing or pass any motion related thereto. 

*?T^ti_*iii To fiee li the Town wiii vote t0 enaet the following as an 
ordinance to promote the health and welfare of the residents of the Town: 

1. DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this Ordinance, the following words and 
phrases shall have the meaning ascribed to them in this section: 

Building Inspector — The Selectmen of the town or their duly appointed 
agent. 

Dwelling — Dwelling shall mean any building, structure, trailer, 
mobile-home or camp or part thereof, used and occupied for human habitation or 
intended to be so used and includes any appurtenances belonging thereto or 
usually enjoyed therewith. 

Mobile home — A mobile home means a dwelling equipped, or originally 
equipped, with axles and/or readily movable to another location. Whether or not 
the unit is jacked or blocked up or placed upon a foundation so as to be 
immobile, it shall nevertheless be governed by this Ordinance. 

Trailer — Trailer shall mean any vehicle used or so constructed as to 
permit its being used as a conveyance on the public streets and highways and duly 
licensed as such, and constructed in such a manner as will permit occupancy 
thereof as a dwelling or sleeping place for one or more persons. A trailer under 
this Ordinance shall also mean Tent Trailers, Truck Campers or other sleeping 
facilities other than a mobile home and/or what normally constitutes a permanent 
dwelling unit. 

?i_?WIttI*!9§ II W*ter iyEEfiZ-fD^-ElEfiiyti^O-^^Qt?^!-??**^^^^?^-???:*^^?' ** 

dwelling within the town of Pittsfield shall be occupied until a construction 

permit and operation permit for the septic system issued by the Water Supply and 

Pollution Control Commission has been filed with the Building Inspector or if 

said dwelling is to be attached to the municipal sewer system, proof of such 

connection has been provided to the Town. 

3 i _M0BILE HOMES ll_Water_Suggly_and_Pollution_Control_Co A 

permit to place or occupy a mobile home within the Town of Pittsfield shall not 
be issued until a construction permit issued by the Water Supply and Pollution 
Control Commission has been filed with the Building Inspector or if said mobile 
home is to be attached to the municipal sewer system, proof of such connection 
has been provided to the Town. Nor shall a permit be issued to place or occupy a 
mobile home within the Town of Pittsfield so long as the applicant is in 
violation of any statute or town regulation or ordinance relating to mobile 
homes. No mobile home shall be occupied until an operation permit is issued by 
the aforementioned agency and filed with the building inspector where the mobile 
home is not served by the municipal system or until such proof has been provided 
to the town where the mobile home is served by the municipal system. 

4. SEASONAL USES Individual mobile homes or trailers used for seasonal or 



- 6 - 



recreational dwelling purposes, being maintained, established, stationed, or 
parked for a period in excess of forty-five days within the Town of Pittsfield 
shall require written approval from the Health Officer prior to construction or 
operation of sewage systems not requiring approval from the New Hampshire Water 
Supply and Pollution Control Commission, i.e., self-contained toilets without 
running water, including privies and portable chemical toilets. No mobile home 
or trailer shall be occupied for seasonal use until said written approval by the 
Health Officer has been provided to the town by the applicant. 

§i_APPRQVAL_BY_HEALTH_OFFICER If, in the opinion of the Health Officer and 
the Board of Health, conditions exist, such as poor soil conditions or terrain 
that would not allow obtaining an operating permit from the Water Supply and 
Pollution Control Commission, the Health Officer may issue a written approval for 
an alternate method of waste disposal that would meet then current available 
Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission standards. Such approval shall be 
in lieu of and an operating permit issued by the Water Supply and Pollution 
Control Commission. 

S^OCCUPANCYPERMIT Upon complying with the above applicable requirement, 
the Board of Selectmen shall issue a non-transferable Occupancy Permit to the 
applicant for the dwelling or mobile home concerned. No dwelling or mobile home 
shall be occupied until said permit is issued. 

Zi-E'fO^i^X Construction, placement or occupancy of a dwelling or mobile home 
in violation of this ordinance shall be subject to a fine of Ten Dollars ($10.00) 
per day, each day constituting a separate violation, commencing upon receipt by 
the violator of notice of such violation and intent to invoke the penalty sent to 
the violator by certified mail, return receipt requested by the building 
inspector. 

§ 1 _Gffective_Date This ordinance shall become effective upon its passage. 

ARTICLEflg^ To see if the Town will vote to accept the following Trust 
Funds for perpetual care .of the following lots at Floral Park Cemetery i 

Kel ley-Car r Lot by Dorothy Kelley 19200 

John D. Sherburne Lot by Haxine Feero $300 
Gross-Fischer Lot by Diana Fischer $250 

AKnCLEfllaN To see if the Town will vote by secret ballot to have the Road 
Agent position be elected by the voters for period of two years in lieu of being 
appointed by the Selectmen. [BY PETITION] 

ARTICLE #1^ To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Pittsfield 

Volunteer Fire Department to replace the 194B American LaFrance ladder truck, at 
no cost to the town, which was accepted at the Narch 11, 1980 town meeting. 

*?II9t§_*I5i To fiee li the Town wiii vote to nave the *embers of the budget 
committee, consisting of nine [9] members, elected as provided by NH RSA 32i2. 

ARTICLE_1§^ To see if the Town will vote to amend the Nobile Home Ordinance 
adopted on April 3, 1973 as follows: 

By adding the following new sections: 

3.9.2.3 Other than is provided in Section 3.9.5, No mobile home or trailer 
shall be maintained, established, stationed or parked outside of a mobile home 
park or trailer park except on a lot, which shall contain at least one acre and 
which shall be separate from all other lota containing a dwelling structure. 

3.9.5 The Planning Board may grant a special temporary permit, not to exceed 
six months, for the maintenance of a mobile home or trailer upon a lot for 



- 7 - 



dwelling purposes during the construction of a permanent dwelling structure 
thereon, upon terms and conditions as the Planning Board may direct. 

3.10.4 The Planning Board may grant a permit to any applicant based upon a 
variance of the provisions of this Ordinance as justice may require, provided 
that the applicant has substantially complied with the terms of the Ordinance. 

3.10.5 The Planning Board may delegate to the Board of Selectmen or its 
designee, the processing of applications, fees and communications with 
applicants. 

By adding the following sentence to the end of Section 3.10.3: 

Any applicant may, in writing, waive the sixty-day requirement for action 
upon an application. 

AftTICLE_#17 1 To transact any other business which may legally come before 
this meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal this 20th day of February, in the year of our 
lord, Nineteen Hundred Eighty Five. 



Floyd J. Carson. Selectman 
Saverio Buatti, Selectman 
Leo W. Fraser, Jr., Selectman 

A true copy of warrant attest: 

Floyd J. Carson, Selectman 
Saverio Buatti, Selectman 
Leo W. Fraser, Jr., Selectman 



- 8 - 



1985 BUDGET 
SOURCES OF REVENUES 



TAXES 

Reaident Taxea 

National Bank Stock Taxea 

Yield Taxea 

Intereat & Penaltiea on Taxea 

Reaident Tax Penaltiea 

Niacellaneoua-Yield Tax Penaltiea 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-STATE 

Shared Revenue-Block Grant 
Highway Block Grant 
State Aid Water Pollution Projects 
Buaineaa Prof ita Tax 

LICENSES AND PERMITS 



Estimated 


Actual 


Select* 


Eat 


Revenuea 


Revenuea 


Budqet 


Revenuea 


1984 


1984 


1985 


1985 


<\,/\,«\,/W«\»'V'\/ 


r^/^/V./V'V/'V.'v/'V/'V.'^ 


<V,<V,<t,4,<V'\r'V'V 


^/V-^/Vv'N/'v'v 


15,000 


12,820.00 


16,000 


16,000 


80 


62.80 


10 


10 


2,000 


1,790.28 


2,000 


2,000 


30 , 000 


38,292.90 


35,000 


35,000 


250 


265.00 


200 


200 


50 


2,656.50 







54,800 52.292.00 53,000 53,000 

40,148 40,185.92 45.948 45.948 

56,239 56,239.00 69,272 69,272 

95,000 98,304.39 97,000 97,000 



Motor Vehicle Permit Feea 

Dog Licenaea 

Buaineaa Licenaea, Peraita & Filing Fee 

CHARGES FOR SERVICES 



Income froa Departaenta 

MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 

Intereat on Depoaita 
Sale of Town Property 
Incoae From Truata Funda 



65,000 


122,259.00 


110,000 


122,000 


1,600 


1,442.30 


1,500 


1,500 


3,000 


2,304.00 


4,500 


4,500 



6,375 22,754.10 



14,690 



14,690 



9,000 


12.977.03 


12,000 


12,000 


1,000 


1.240.00 


1,000 


1.000 


500 


0.00 


635 


635 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 



Incoae froa Water and Sewer Departaenta 69,205 

Withdrawal froa Capital Reaerve 

Revenue Sharing Fund 45,500 



TOTAL REVENUES 



59,852.10 
44,111.04 
514,747 569,848.36 



71,997 
20,000 
43,200 



71,997 
20,000 
43,200 



597,952 609.952 



- 9 - 



BUDGET FOR 1985 
FOR THE TOWN OF PITTSFIELD, N.H. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Approp. 
1984 



Select* 
Budget Recoaa. 
1985 1985 









Not 
Recoaa. 
1985 



Town Officers Salary 

Town Officers Expenses 

Election & Registration Expenses 

Cemeteries 

General Governaent Buildings 

Planning & Zoning 

Legal Expenses 



44,131 


48,204 


47,144 


16,440 


13,875 


13,875 


1 , 030 


1,790 


1,790 


300 


300 


300 


8,300 


15,795 


16,695 


300 


200 


200 


5,100 


5,100 


5,100 



1,060 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police Departaent 

Fire Departaent 

Civil Defense 

Building Inspection Housing Stand 

Dog & Aniaal Control 



59,962 


80,094 


78,594 


1,500 


25,215 


26 . 550 


25,750 


800 


100 


100 


100 




500 


6,200 


6,200 




1,675 


1,275 


1,275 





HIGHWAYS, STREETS, & BRIDGES 

Town Maintenance 

General Highway Departaent Expenses 

Street Lighting 

Care of Trees 

Asphalt Road Sealing 

Snow Reaoval 

Sidewalk Construction 

Highway Subsidy 



12,315 


121,336 


116,336 


34,050 


29,550 


29,550 


19,000 


19,000 


19,000 


2,050 


2,900 


2,900 


18,000 


18,000 


18,000 


4,000 


4,000 


4,000 


5,000 


10,000 


10,000 


30,000 


45,948 


45,948 



5,000 



SANITATION 



Solid Waste Disposal Incinerator 

Stora Sewer 

Town Dump & Stuap Duap 



6,135 


28,553 


28,553 


4,750 


7,500 


7,500 


2,300 


2,300 


2,300 



WELFARE 

General Assistance 
Old Age Assistance 
Aid to the Disabled 
Nursing Care 
Coapensation 



' 



10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


700 


700 


700 


3,000 


5,090 


5,090 


5,800 


9,215 


9,215 


1,200 


1,250 


1,250 



- 10 - 





Select* 




Not 


Appr op . 


Budget 


Recoil. 


Recoil. 


1984 


1985 


1985 


1985 


/\, /\, (^ /\, f\j f\, *\, 


'\.'\.'\.<W'V'\. 


<\»»VN»«V«\»'\»'V 


«S.«W«S»'V«V«» 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 

Library 

Parka & Recreation 

Patriotic Purposes 

DEBT SERVICE 



Principal of Long-Term Bonda & Notea 
Intereat Expenaea-Long-Teri Bonda & Notea 
Interest Expenses-Tax Anticipation Notea 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 



Highway Truck-1 ton 4X4 

Audit-1984 

Police Cruiser 

Sander 

Salt Shed 

Town Hall Planning 

F.B. Argue Memorial Pool Improvements 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 



Payments to Capital Reserve Funds 
Municipal Bldg. - Renovation/Const. 
Police Cruiser 
Fire Apparatus 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Municipal Water Department Pitta. Aqueduct 

Municipal Sewer Department 

F.I.C.A. Retirement & Penaion Contribution 

Inaurance 

Community Action Program 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



13,100 

6,566 

400 



45,000 

61,447 

5,000 



20,000 
5,000 



13,050 

7,712 

535 



60,000 

58,935 

9,000 



12,500 
7,200 
5,000 

14,000 
1,000 



13,050 

7,712 

535 



60,000 

58,935 

9,000 



12,500 
7,200 
5,000 

14,000 
1,000 



10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


7,000 






3,500 


3,500 


3,500 




15,000 


15,000 



35,292 


35,765 


36,431 




69,205 


71,898 


71,898 




23,675 


33,333 


31,821 


1,512 


20,855 


22,866 


22,866 




1,042 


1,105 


1,105 





768,435 897,224 888,918 



9,872 



- 11 - 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT 



BANK 



MATURITY 



PRINCIPAL 



INTEREST 



N.H. Municipal Bond Bank 

Wastewater Treatment 
Facility 



1985 
1986-2007 



40,000 
880,000 

920,000 



53,760 
589,380 

643,140 



Highway Garage 



1985 


20,000 


5,175 


1986 


20,000 


3,935 


1987 


20,000 


2,595 


1988 


15,000 


1,155 



75,000 



12.860 



TOTAL DEBT 



995,000 



656.000 



CURRENT USE REPORT 



Nuaber of property owners granted Current Use exemptions 
Total number of acrea exempted under current uae 
Nuiber of acrea taken out of current uae 



Fara Land 

Foreat Land-Nixed 

Wildland-Unproductive 

Wild land-Productive 

Wetland 

Deacretionary Eaaeaent 





92.00 




5591.29 




35.00 


No. of 


No. of 


Ownera 


Acrea 




•X.-VW** 


57 


1048.32 


60 


2721.32 


8 


300.70 


27 


1289.91 


18 


226.04 


1 


5.00 



- 12 - 



INVENTORY OF TOWN 



Land - Iaproved and Uniaproved 

Buildings 

Public Water Utility (Privately Owned) 

Public Utilities (Electric Plants) 

Trailers and Mobile Homes 

TOTAL VALUATION BEFORE EXEMPTIONS ALLOWED! 
Elderly Exemptions 

NET VALUATION ON WHICH TAX RATE IS COMPUTED 



1982 


1983 


1984 


^^/V/^/V^ 


t'V'H.O.t'W'S.'V* 


%%%»»»»»%% 


9,578,735 


9,586,970 


9,645,860 


23,108,510 


23,597,980 


24,142,950 


423,970 


430,480 


430,460 


637,880 


637,880 


637,880 


841,220 


893,600 


863,320 



34,590,315 
190,170 



35,146,910 
177,670 



35 , 542 , 820 
177,670 



34,400,145 34,969,240 35,542,820 



TAX RATE INFORMATION 



1982 



1983 



1984 



Net Town Appropriation 

Net School Appropriation 

County Tax Assessment 

War Service Credits 

Overlay 

Less: Business Profits Tax 

PROPERTY TAXES TO BE RAISED 



School 

Town 

County 





289,513 


287,433 


315,688 




948,065 


1,020,280 


1,073,259 




96,532 


107,761 


126,227 




15,450 


16,800 


16,400 




26,959 


48,429 


10,124 




(96,834) 


(98,119) 


(98,304) 




1,279,685 


1,382,584 


1,443,394 


TAX RATE 










1982 


1983 


1984 




25.60 


27.22 


28.26 




8.90 


9.36 


8.94 




2.70 


2.94 


3.41 



37.20 



39.54 



40.61 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town Hall Land and Buildings 

Furniture & Equipment 
Libraries, Lands and Buildings 

Furniture & Equipment 
Police Department-Equipment 
Fire Department, Lands and Buildings 

Equipment 
Highway Department, Lands and Buildings 

Equipment 
Parka, Commons and Playgrounds 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
School, Lands and Buildings 

Equipment 
All Lands and Buildings Acquired through 

Tax Collector' a Deed and Gifts 
All other Property and Equipment 

Pittsfield Solid Waste Facility (1/4 share) 



57,210 

12.000 

42,650 

74,000 

20,000 

158,670 

121,000 

125,320 

140,500 

120,070 

3,450,000 

1,054,480 

100,000 

97,070 

65,235 

5,638,205 



- 13 - 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 



GENERAL FUND 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1384 
Receipts during year 



Leaa Selectmen 'a Vouchera Paid 
Balance December 31, 1984 



264,437.14 
2,714,430.40 

2,968,867.54 
2,788,599.00 

180,268.54 



GENERAL FUND SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
Balance January 1, 1984 
Transferred to General Fund 

Balance December 31, 1984 



21.52 
21.52 

0.00 



NENORIAL FUND 

Balance January 1, 1984 
Interest 

Balance December 31, 1984 



1,913.40 
107.97 

2,021.37 



GEORGE BUNKER TRUST FUND 

Balance January 1, 1984 

Depoalta 

Interest 

Balance December 31, 1984 



4,926.94 
659.46 
292.13 

5,880.53 



REVENUE SHARING 

Balance January 1, 1984 

Interest 

Receipts 

Withdrawals 

Bslsnce December 31, 1984 



18,264.13 

1,382.99 

36,827.00 

44,111.04 

12,363.08 



FORESTRY RESERVE 

Balance January 1, 1984 
Intereat 

Balance December 31, 1984 



3,767.91 
212.60 

3,980.51 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Sandra M. Naraton, Treaaurer 



- 14 - 



BALANCE SHEET 
DECEMBER 31,1984 



ASSETS 

CASH 

General Fund 

Revenue Sharing Fund 

Town Foreat Reaerve Account 

TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF SELECTMEN 
Bunker Truat Fund 
War Memorial Fund 

DUE FROM MUNICIPAL SEWER FUND 

INVENTORY - Fuels 

TAXES DUE ON PROPERTY TAX DEEDED TO TOWN 

UNREDEEEMED TAXES 
Levy of 1983 
Levy of 1982 

UNCOLLECTED TAXES 
Levy of 1984 
Levy of 1983 
Levy of 1982 
Levy of 1981 
Levy of 1980 

TOTAL ASSETS 

LIABILITIES 

SCHOOL DISTRICT APPROPRIATION PAYABLE 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

ENCUNBERED APPROPRIATIONS 

Highway Garage - Planning & Land Acquisition 

Parka & Recreation 

Municipal Sewer Fund 

Sidewalks 

Town Hall - Content Fire Damages 

Town Hall - Insurance Proceeds for building 

YIELD TAX DEPOSITS 

REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

FORESTRY RESERVE ACCOUNT 

TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF SELECTMEN 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 

EXCESS OF ASSETS OVER LIABILITIES 



2,098.26 
370.00 
4,300.00 
5,000.00 
6,974.56 
5,000.00 



180,268.94 

12,363.08 

3,980.51 



5,880.53 
2,021.37 

10,077.00 

5,022.49 

5,155.71 



75,327.99 
26,814.56 



236,260.09 
7,591.15 
5,647.13 
4,273.07 

2,303.50 

582,986.72 



430,505.00 
1,250.06 



23,742.82 

5,321.35 

12,363.08 

3,980.51 

7,901.90 

485,064.72 

97,922.00 



- 15 - 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS & EXPENDITURES 

Title of Appropriation Appropriation Receipt 

Town Office Compensation 44,131.00 

Town Office Expenditures 16,440.00 153.00 

Election/Registration Expenses 1,030.00 

Town Hall /Other Bldgs. 8,300.00 50.45 

Police Department 59,962.00 5,644.05 

Fire Department 25,215.00 

Dog & Animal Control 1,675.00 125.00 

Planning & Zoning 300.00 728.48 

Civil Defense 100.00 

Care of Trees 2,050.00 

Insurance 20,855.00 30.00 

Solid Waste Facility 26,135.00 754.91 

Town Dump/Stump Dump 2.300.00 

Storm Sewer Maintenance 4,750.00 

Town Maintenance 112,315.00 2,088.97 

Road (Re) Construction 30,000.00 

Asphalt Road Sealing 18,000.00 

Sidewalk Construction 5,000.00 

Snow Removal 4,000.00 

Street Lights 19,000.00 

General Exp/Equip Maintenance 34,050.00 

Library 13,100.00 

Welfare 20.700.00 860.50 

Patriotic Purposes 400.00 

Recreation & Parks 6,566.00 1,657.04 

Pittsfield Aqu. Co. -Hydrant 35,292.00 

Cemeteries 300.00 

Community Action Program 1,042.00 

Legal 5,000.00 

Town Administrative Study Committee 100.00 

Employees Benefits 23.675.00 22.70 

Housing Standards Agency 500.00 45.00 

Long Term Notes & Bonds-Prin. 45.000.00 

Long Term Notes & Bonds-Int. 61.447.00 150.00 

Tax Antic Notes-Interest 5.000.00 

1983 Financial Audit 5.000.00 

1 Ton 4X4 Highway Truck 20,000.00 

Paymts to Capital Reserve 20,500.00 

Wastewater Treat Plant 69.205.00 



Totals 768.435.00 12.310.10 



- 16 - 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31. 1984 

Total Encumbered Unexpended 

Available Expenditurea Balance (Overdraft) 

44,131.00 43,615.42 615.68 

16,593.00 16,072.82 520.18 

1,030.00 1,3&1.49 (321.49) 

8,350.45 7,698.57 651.88 

65,606.05 68,564.95 (2,958.90) 

25,215.00 22,407.78 2,807.22 

1,800.00 1,477.85 322.15 

1,028.48 315.51 712.97 

100.00 0.00 100.00 

2,050.00 3,540.08 (1,490.08) 

20,885.00 19,978.34 906.66 

26,889.91 26,373.61 516.30 

2,300.00 2,131.38 168.62 

4,750.00 2,983.33 1,766.67 

114,403.97 124,009.52 (9,605.55) 

30,000.00 32,701.45 (2,701.45) 

18,000.00 17.934.38 65.62 

5,000.00 0.00 5,000.00 0.00 

4.000.00 3,083.28 916.72 

19,000.00 17,790.92 1,209.08 

34,050.00 34,957.86 (907.86) 

13,100.00 13,100.00 0.00 

21,560.50 26,571.00 (5,010.50) 

400.00 332.38 67.62 

8,223.04 5,556.84 2,666.20 

35,292.00 35,292.00 0.00 

300.00 598.32 (298.32) 

1,042.00 1,042.00 0.00 

5,000.00 8,279.38 (3,279.38) 

100.00 0.00 100.00 

23,697.70 23,490.16 207.54 

545.00 2,631.27 (2,086.27) 

45,000.00 45,000.00 0.00 

61,597.00 61,596.96 0.04 

5,000.00 10,096.77 (5,096.77) 

5,000.00 4,200.00 800.00 

20,000.00 19,825.64 174.36 

20,500.00 20,500.00 0.00 

69,205.00 60,512.80 8,692.20 

780.745.10 785,514.06 5.000.00 (9.768.96) 



- 17 - 



PITTSFIELD SOLID WASTE FACILITY 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

Balance 12/31/83 27.106.27 

Interest Earned 1984 1,739.92 



28,846.19 
Purchase of New Loader 8,740.00 



Balance in Construction Account 12/31/84 20,106.19 

Concord National Bank Savings 32.97 

Concord National Bank Checking 643.83 

Suncook Bank C/D # 48344600 19,429.39 



20.106.19 
0PERAT0N ACCOUNT 

Balance 12/31/84 11,208.19 

RECEIPTS: 

Barnstead 23.424.00 

Chichesterd 14.420.00 

Epson 26.135.00 

Pittsfield 26.135.00 

OTHER INCOME 

Burning 75.00 

Cardboard 1,906.65 

Refunds 3.919.83 

Scraps 270.00 

Tires 112.60 

Interest on Checking 721.25 



97.119.33 
Available Funds 108,327.52 



- 18 - 



PITT5FIELD SOLID WASTE FACILITY 
BUDGET 



Wages 

F.I.C.A. 

Repairs 

Propane 

Gaa L Oil 

Lights 

Telephone 

Part a & Supplies 

Land Fill & Hauling 

Red Keeping Aud 

Tirea 

Insurance 

Dozer Work 

U.C. Fund 

Contingency Fund 

Postage 

Association Dues 

Misc. & Mileage 

Freight 

Advertising 

Refractory Work 

Site Work 

New Fence 



1984 


1984 


1985 


BUDGET 


EXPENSES 


BUDGET 


******** 


******** 


•W^A. ****** 


37,320 


37,650.10 


39,417.00 


1,411 


1.449.53 


1,557.00 


3,300 


2,831.92 


3,400.00 


1,500 


0.00 


1,000.00 


2,000 


1,740.84 


2 , 000 . 00 


4,000 


4,102.75 


4,400.00 


300 


279.60 


300.00 


2,500 


2,602.21 


2 , 000 . 00 


28, 800 


26,817.49 


32,000.00 


1,200 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


600 


0.00 


400.00 


9,900 


8,981.56 


9,900.00 


5,000 


1,524.91 


3,000.00 


1,000 


355.03 


500.00 


5,000 


0.00 


5,000.00 


90 


40.00 


90.00 


1,000 


1,100.00 


1,200.00 


200 


230.92 


300.00 





0.00 


400.00 





210.82 


100.00 





8,000.00 


0.00 





6.740.00 


0.00 





2,150.00 


0.00 


105,121 


108,007.68 


108,164.00 



1984 Available Funds 
1984 Expenses 

Balance Operations Account 



108.327.52 
108,007.68 

319.84 



ACCEPTED 1985 Budget 
Eatiaated Revenuea 

Aaount to be Raised 



108.164.00 
6,190.00 

101,974.00 



POPULATION 


PERCENT 


1985 


1984 










PORTION 


PORTION 


DIFFERENCE 


Barnstead 


2,625 


2656 


26,513 


23,431.00 


+3,082 


Chichester 


1,584 


16* 


16,316 


14,420.00 


+1,896 


Epsom 


3.063 


30* 


30.592 


26,135.00 


+4,457 


Pittsfield 


2,849 


28* 


28,553 


26,135.00 


+2,418 



10,121 



100* 



101,974 



- 19 - 



REPORT OF THE TRUST FUNDS OF THE 



DATE NAME OF TRUST FUND 

*V*WA* *\» *V *V A# *V A* *\* A* *V *\# A# *\* *\* *\* A# A# A* *V 

1933 Butler, Chas. & Mary 

1934 Carpenter, Georgia 
1934 Carpenter, Josiah 
1934 Foote, Lizzie T. 
1937 Lane, Ella 

1914 Emerson, Berry 

1948 Joy, James 

1945 Kent, Moody 

1948 Merrill, Thoa. D. 

1948 French, Frances 
1968 Diat. Nursing Schol. 
1970 Grace Berry 

McQueaten Fund 

1949 Green, Frank P. 
1948 Pitta. Academy Fund 

1950 Bartlett, Capt. Aaa. 

1961 Hook, Margaret 

1972 Sanderson, E.P. Fund 

1973 Mt. Calvary Trust 
1976 Argue, Dr. F.B. Fund 
1978 Quaker Cemetery 
1981 Pitts. Sled Dog Fund 

1981 Capital Reserve Fund 

1982 Capital Reserve Fund 







BALANCE 


NEW 




PURPOSE OF TRUST FUND 


a 


YEAR BEGIN 


FUNDS 




Carpenter Library Books 


1,000.00 




Carpenter Library Booka 


b 


10,000.00 






Carpenter Library Books 


b 


10,000.00 






Carpenter Library Booka 


a 


3,100.00 






Pittafield School Diat. 


b 


25 , 000 . 00 






Pittafield High School 










Books & Appratus 


d 


944.09 






Pittafield High School 










Teachers & Pupila 


a 


2,430.00 






PHS-Studenta 


d 


500.00 






PHS-Students 


a 


1,147.40 






PHS-Students 


a 


1,462.84 






PHS-Students 


e 


6,505.47 






Bandstand 


f 


100.00 






Pittafield High School 


a 


4,219.18 






Civil War Memor. 










CW Vets Graves 


m 


1,150.00 






Floral Park Cem. 


a 


17.399.77 






Education, Culture 










Health & Welfare 


h 


681,617.08 






Ht. Calvary Cem. 


i 


2,000.00 






Medical Schol . Fund 


3 


2,600.00 






Quaker Cem. Maint. 


k 


5,000.00 






Carpenter Library Books 


i 


522.63 






Wastewater Plant 




5.000.00 






Highway Equip- 










Mun. Bldq. & Cruiaer 




12,220.69 


40,000. 


00 


TOTAL SPECIAL FUNDS 




793.919.15 


40,000. 


,00 


TOTAL CEMETERY FUNDS 




119.595.05 


850. 


,00 


TOTAL ALL FUNDS 




913.514.20 


40.850. 


,00 



a NHSB 7.75k CD 

b MSB 9.5k CD 

c MSB 8* CD 

d NHSB 9.85k CD 

e NHSB 8.5% CD 

f NHSB 5.5k Savings 

g AM. SB 7.5k CD 

h AM. BK. TR. DIV. 

i NHSB 10.55k 

j NHSB 12k CD 

k NHSB 8k CD 

1 NHSB 13.233k CD 

m AH. SB 14.35k CD 



- 20 - 



TOWN OF PITTSFIELD ON DECEMBER 31, 1984 



GAINS / BALANCE BALANCE INCOME EXPENDED BALANCE 
LOSSES YEAR END YEAR BEGIN FOR YEAR FOR YEAR YEAR END 



1,000.00 82.01 82.01 

10,000.00 977.19 977.19 

10,000.00 977.19 977.19 

3,100.00 254.25 254.25 

25,000.00 2,103.35 2,103.35 

944.09 100.34 100.34 



This Is to certify that the information contained in this 
report is complete and correct to the best of our knowledge 
and belief. 





2,430.00 


10.00 




215.94 




225.94 






500.00 


133.19 




59.85 




70.00 


123.04 




1,147.40 


10.00 




101.96 




111.96 






1,462.84 


10.00 




130.00 




140.00 






6,505.47 


5,621.75 




810.78 


1, 


,641.00 


4,791.53 




100.00 


66.26 




9.42 






75.68 




4,219.18 


10.00 




374.94 




384.94 






1.150.00 


173.89 




179.84 




80.00 


273.73 




17,399.77 


495.16 


1 


,448.25 


1 


,420.50 


522.91 


44,893.87 


726,510.95 


17,118.99 


63 


,250.83 


59 


,979.46 


20,390.36 




2,000.00 


2,088.53 




322.33 






2,410.86 




2,600.00 


513.17 




313.94 




350.00 


477.11 




5,000.00 


730.92 




462.86 




370.00 


823.78 




522.63 


12.11 




42.58 




54.69 






5,000.00 


3,235.42 




780.53 






4,015.95 




52,220.69 


4,618.21 


3 


,374.88 






7,993.09 


44,893.87 


878,813.02 


34,847.60 


76 


,373.26 


69 


,322.82 


41,898.04 




120,445.05 


61,495.42 


18 


,387.09 


8 


,218.00 


71,664.51 


44,893.87 


999,258.07 


96,343.02 


94 


,760.35 


77 


,540.82 


113,562.55 






CERTIFICATION 













George E. Holloway, Jr. 

John H. Perkins, Jr. 

Ogden H. Boyd, Sr. 

Trustees 



- 21 - 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
PITTSFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Financial Report of the E.P. Sanderson Trust Fund 
For the Year Ending 10/31/64 

Invested and Managed by the Amoskeag National Bank & Trust Company under 
direction of and with approval of the Trustees at Trust Funds, Pittsfield, N.H., 
in accordance with the will of E.P. Sanderson. 



PRINCIPAL - ACCOUNT #50-0942-00 

Initial Payment 7/14/72 500,000.00 

Additional Payment 12/26/72 100,000.00 

Additional Payment 11/26/73 70,000.00 

Additional Payment 2/26/74 14,000.00 

Additional Payment 2/26/75 627.37 



Original Investment Total 684,627.37 

Gains & Losses to date -3,010.29 

44,893.87 



Book Value 10/31/84 726.510.95 

Market Value 10/31/84 805,109.46 

INCOME - ACCOUNT #50-0942-77 

Balance 10/31/83 17,118.99 

Dividends & Interest to 10/31/84 63,250.83 



Total Income 80,369.82 

EXPENDITURES 



Pittsfield Historical Society 200.00 

Pittsfield Area Arts Council 800.00 

Concord Regional Visiting Nurse Assoc. 5,257.06 

Center Barnstead F.D. Ambulance Service 10,425.00 

Pittsfield School District 40,000.00 

Compensation - Amoskeag Trust Co. 3,297.40 



Total Expenditures 59,979.46 

Balance of Income 10/31/84 20.3Su..?6 

George E. Holloway, Jr. 
John H. Perkins, Jr. 
Ogden H. Boyd, Sr. 
TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 



- 22 - 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 






## DEBITS #♦ 

UNCOLLECTED TAXES - 1/1/64 
Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 
Land Use Change Taxes 
Yield Taxes 
Siel Road 

TAXES COMMITTED TO COLLECTOR 
Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 
National Bank Stock Taxes 
Land Use Change Taxes 

ADDED TAXES 

Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 
Yield Taxes 

INTEREST COLLECTED ON DELINQUENT 
PROPERTY TAXES 

PENALTIES COLLECTED ON RESIDENT TAXES 

TOTAL DEBITS 

#* CREDITS ** 



1984 


1983 


PRIOR 


LEVY 


LEVY 


YEAR 


~~~~ 


**** 


*W«V\tf«\# 




240,756.04 


419.62 




3,910.00 






1,518.70 






1,952.26 






425.56 


425.56 


1,428,797.60 






16,470.00 






62.80 






6,186.20 






6,608.73 


3,016.55 




1 , 360 . 00 


3,502.63 




1,995.28 


7,843.63 


13.30 


63.00 


209.00 




1,461,543.61 


263,134.37 


858.46 



REMITTANCES TO TREASURER 
DURING FISCAL YEAR 

Property Taxes 

Resident Taxes 

National Bank Stock Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Siel Road 

Land Use Change Taxes 

Interest Collected During Year 

Penalties on Resident Taxes 

Tax Deeded To Town 

ABATEMENTS MADE DURING YEAR 
Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 

UNCOLLECTED TAXES - 12/31/84 
Property Taxes 
Resident Taxes 
Land Ues Chg. Tax 
Siel Road 
Yield Tax 

TOTAL CREDITS 



1,193.278.47 


242,547.62 


419.62 


12,770.00 


2 , 090 . 00 




62.80 


1,415.22 






212.78 


212.78 


6,166.20 






1,995.28 


7,843.63 


13.30 


63.00 


209.00 




1,733.99 






9,093.78 


1,224.97 




100.00 






231,300.09 






4 , 960 . 00 


1,620.00 
1,518.70 






212.78 


212.78 




4,039.67 




1,461,543.61 


263,134.37 


656.46 



- 23 - 



»* DEBITS *» 

UNCOLLECTED TAXES - 1/1/84 
Resident Taxes 
Yield Tax 
Penalties on Resident Tax 

TOTAL DEBITS 



1982 


1981 


1980 


*<wv* 


r^r^r-jr.j 


^jf\j/\ J ,'\j 


4,540.00 


4 , 050 . 00 


1,570.00 


1 , 204 . 35 


233.07 


733.50 


1.00 


1.00 




5,445.35 


4,284.07 


2.303.50 



** CREDITS ♦ * 



REMITTANCES TO TREASURER 



Resident Tax 






10.00 


10.00 




Resident Tax 


Penalties 




1.00 


1.00 








11.00 


11.00 


0.00 


UNCOLLECTED TAXES 


- 12/31/84 










Resident Tax 




4, 


,230.00 


4,040.00 


1,570.00 


Yield Tax 




1, 


, 204 . 35 


233.07 


733.50 




5, 


,434.35 


4,273.07 


2,303.50 


TOTAL CREDITS 




5, 


,445.35 


4,284.07 


2 , 303 . 50 



SUMMARY OF TAX SALES ACCOUNTS 



** DEBITS ** 



Balance of Unredeemed Taxes 

Beginning Fiscal Year 

Taxes Sold to Town During 

Current Fiscal Year 

Interest Collected After Sale 

TOTAL DEBITS 



1983 




1982 


1981 


LEVY 




LEVY 


LEVY 


ww 




i V / \/'V\/ 


r\, i\, *\,j\, 






76,057.83 


27.183.99 


103,461, 


.11 






1,040, 


.20 


7,692.49 


7,167.59 


104,501, 


,31 


83,750.32 


34,351.58 



♦♦CREDITS ** 



REMITTANCES TO TREASURER 
Redemptions 

Int & Costs after Sale 
Deeded to Town during year 
Unredeemed Taxes - 12/31/84 

TOTAL CREDITS 



26,365.68 
1,040.20 
1 , 767 . 44 

75,327.99 

104,501.31 



47.390.47 
7,692.49 
1,852.80 

26,814.56 

83.750.32 



24,944.61 

7,167.59 

1,535.47 

703.91 

34,351.58 



Respectfully submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast, Tax Collector 



- 24 - 



STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 



TOWN OFFICE COMPENSATION 

Selectmen 3,200.00 

Administrative Assistant 18,300.10 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector 11,200.02 

Town Treasurer 1,250.00 

Trustees of Trust Funds 1,290.00 

Secretary/Bookkeeper 8,115.30 

Town Moderator BO. 00 

Auditors 0.00 

Health Officer 150.00 



43,515.42 

TOWN OFFICE EXPENDITURES 

Printing & Advertising 4,685.30 

Telephone 1,050.26 

Office Supplies 1,471.11 

Postage 1,027.44 

Equipment Nalntenance 408.00 

Dues & Subscriptions 918.98 

Nileage 463.51 

Miscellaneous 210.63 

New Construction Appraisals 234.86 

Data Processing 1,021.00 

Tax Map Maintenance 750.00 
TOWN CLERK / TAX COLLECTOR 

Printing & Advertising 346.37 

Telephone 579.50 

Office Supplies 114.68 

Postage 1,080.70 

Dues & Subscriptions 58.25 

Registry Fees 525.80 

Treasure's Expenses 68.64 

Trustees Expenses 54.25 

New Office Equipment 1,003.54 

16,072.82 
ELECTION/REGISTRATION EXPENSE 

Supervisiors of Checklist 400.00 

Ballot Clerks 120.00 

Meals 270.00 

Ballots & Supplies 561.49 



1,351.49 
TOWN HALL k OTHER BUILDINGS 

Custodian 1,008.00 

Town Clock 270.00 

Supplies 838.47 

Repairs 811.07 

Electricity 1,210.69 

Fuel Oil 1,905.47 

Fire Station 110.45 

Highway Garage 644.42 

Library 900.00 

Space Rental 0.00 



7,698.57 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Police Chief 17,493.84 



- 25 - 



Police Patrolman 10,400.99 

Part-time Officers 12,452.76 

Jail/Prisoner Care 831.38 

Security Officer 1,976.56 

DWI Grant 3.360.00 

Cruiser Maintenance 4,157.81 

Gas & Oil 4,494.73 

Mileage 260.25 

Dispatch Service 6,944.60 

Telephones 1,299.31 

Radio Equipment Maintenance 1,333.24 

New Equipment 467.24 

Uniforms 1,130.39 

Admin. Expenses & Equip. 1,789.30 

Training 172.53 

68,564.95 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Compensation/Training 5,693.35 

Repairs - Apparatus 1,621.18 

Gas/Diesel Fuel 1,224.09 

Dispatch Service 3,457.00 

Telephone 430.95 

Alarm Upgrade 156.70 

New Equipment 5,242.99 

Supplies & Repairs 1,406.77 

Snow Plowing 0.00 

Electricity 1,947.55 

Fuel Oil 1,227.20 

Fire Prevention 0.00 

22,407.78 
DOG & ANIMAL CONTROL 

Compensation/Reimbursement 436 .01 

Nileage 166.64 

New Equipment 375.20 

N.H. Humane Sociaty 500.00 

1,477.85 

PLANNING & ZONING 315.51 

CIVIL DEFENSE 0.00 

CARE OF TREES 

Tree Warden 50.00 

Labor 691.08 

Equipment 314.00 

Tree Service 2,485.00 

3,540.08 
INSURANCE 

Worker's Compensation 9,951.20 

Property - Nulti Peril 3,708.00 

Town Officers' Bonds 914.00 

Vehicle Liability 3,548.50 

Employee Life Insurance 346.92 

Fire Dept. Accident Insurance 136.50 

Public Off. & Police Liab. 1,373.22 

19,978.34 



- 26 - 






SOLID WASTE FACILITY 26.373.61 

TOWN DUMP/STUMP DUMP 

Labor 111.34 

Equipment Rental 140.00 

Rental of Dump 1,747.04 

Fill 133.00 

2,131.3ft 
STORM SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Labor 1,597.14 

Equipment Rental 446.00 

Outside Services 35.00 

Supplies & Materials 905.19 

2.983.33 
TOWN MAINTENANCE 

Labor 61,543.27 

Equipment Rental 26,898.33 

Outside Services 860.00 

Sand 6. Gravel 20,877.29 

Cold Patch & Hot Top 4,540.55 

Salt 6,776.60 

Culverts 1,041.16 

Street Signs/Misc. 1,472.32 

124,009.52 
ROAD (RE) CONSTRUCTION 

Labor 4,783.85 

Equipment Rental 3,972.00 

Outside Services 14,130.00 

Sand/Gravel/Materials 9,815.60 

32,701.45 
ASPHALT ROAD SEALING 

Labor 804.50 

Equipment Rental 1,588.62 

Outside Services 90.00 

Supplies & Materials 15,451.26 

17,934.38 
SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION 

Labor 0.00 

Equipment Rental 0.00 

Outside Services 0.00 

Supplies & Materials 0.00 

0.00 
SNOW REMOVAL 

Labor 1,229.28 

Equipment Rental 1,854.00 

3,083.28 

STREET LIGHTS 17,790.92 

GENERAL EXPENSE / EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 

Grader 6.825.35 

Backhoe 3,129.47 

Sanders 1,355.38 

Loader 1,937.59 



- 27 - 



Sidewalk Plow 672.66 

Snow Plow 4,470.85 

York Rake 0.00 

Brush Saw 436.50 

Mower 213.64 

GENERAL OVERHEAD: 

Lubricants/Kerosene 740.27 

Gas/ Diesel Fuel 4,209.43 

One Ton Truck 45.95 

Supplies & Repairs 4,420.43 

Miscellaneous 98.10 

NEW EQUIPMENT: 

New Equipment 4,052.65 

UTILITIES: 

Electricity 896.58 

Fuel Oil 1,020.60 

Telephone 430.41 

34.957.86 

LIBRARY 13,100.00 

WELFARE 

Compensation 1,200.00 

General Assistance 10,351.98 

Old Age Assistance 618.75 

Nursing Care 7,663.27 

Aid to Disabled 6,737.00 



26,571.00 

PATRIOTIC PURPOSES 332.38 

RECREATION & PARKS 

Maintenance-Labor 369.00 

Pool -Coapenaat ion 4,185.00 

Pool-Repairs 16.00 

Pool-Supplies 272.67 

Pool-Electric/Telephone 84.70 

Dustin Park-Electricity 629.47 

Band Concerts 0.00 



5,556.84 

PITTSFIELD AQUEDUCT C0NPANY - HYDRANT RENTAL S, MUNCIPAL SERVICES 35,292.00 

CEMETERIES 

Labor 598.32 

Equipment 0.00 



598 . 32 

COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAM 1.042.00 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Town Counsel 7,979.38 

Town Admin. Study Comm. 0.00 

Judgements 300.00 



8,279.38 
EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 

F.I.C.A. 10,533.18 



- 28 - 



N.H. Retirement 7,468.37 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 5,214.61 

Unemployment Compensation 274.00 

23,490.16 
HOUSING STANDARDS AGENCY 

Printing & Advertising 58.40 

Legal Expenses 2,572.87 

2,631.27 

DEBT SERVICE-LONG TERN NOTES 6. BONDS 

PRINCIPAL 

Grader 0.00 

Incinerator 0.00 

Fire Station 5,000.00 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 20,000.00 

Highway Garage 20,000.00 



45,000.00 



LONG TERN NOTES & BONDS 

INTEREST 

Fire Station 450.00 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 55,060.00 

Highway Garage 6,086.96 



61,596.96 

TAX ANTIC NOTES-INTEREST 10,096.77 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Highway Truck One Ton 4X4 19,825.64 

Audit - 1983 4,200.00 

24,025.64 



PAYHENTS TO CAPITAL RESERVE 

Highway Equipment 10,000.00 

Nunc. Bldg.-Renov. /Const. 7,000.00 

Police Cruiser 3,500.00 



20,500.00 



WASTEWATER TREAT PLANT 

Comp-Plant Operator 16,912.48 

Comp-Part-time 7,156.00 

Committee 350.00 

Automotive 304.23 

Gasoline S. Oil 457.61 

Telephone 346.43 

Telephone-Alarms 585.00 

Chemical 1,945.20 

Lab Equipment 243.98 

Employees's Benefits 3,072.17 



- 29 - 



Parts & Supplies 2,552.71 

User Charge Billing 762.99 

Insurance-Vehicle 300.00 

Insurance-Workers' a Coup. 1,245.68 

Ina. -Flood & Multi Peril 968.00 

Electricity-Treat. Plant 11,390.12 

Fuel Oil-Treat. Plant 2,305.87 

Electricity-Collection System 7,880.44 

Fuel Oil-Collection Systems 0.00 
COLLECTION SYSTEM MAINTENANCE 

Labor 569.44 

Equipment Rental 546.00 

Outaide Servicea 553.95 

Supplies 64.50 

MAJOR Repair/Equip. 0.00 

60.512.80 

TOTAL CURRENT YEAR 785,514.06 



PITT5FIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

83-84 Appropriations 512,992.00 

84-85 Appropriations 642,754.00 

COUNTY TAX 126,227.00 

PRIOR YEAR APPROPRIATIONS 

Street Lights 1,499.25 

Fire Department 207.10 

Library 818.80 

Waatewater Treatment Plant 411.56 

OTHER PAYMENTS (NON TAX RATE RELATED) 

Marriage Licenses & Dog Licenses paid to State of NH 589.50 

New Trust Funds 600.00 

Tax Anticipation Notes 595,000.00 

Yield Tax (Escrow)-Paid to Tax Coll. 2,607.89 

Tax Sale 103,461.11 

Forest B. Argue Memorial Pool 5,000.00 

PROPERTY TAX REFUNDS 2,021.43 

OTHER REFUNDS 620.40 



ENCUMBERED APPROPRIATIONS: 

Sidewalks 5,000.00 

NOTE: Encumbered appropriation have not been expended and therefore are 
not included in the total expenditures as listed for each department. 

F.B. ARGUE MEMORIAL POOL - DETAIL OF TOWNS SHARE 

Foundation 842.50 

Cement Block Work 720.00 

Water Service 174.48 

Electric S. Plumbing 455.50 

Framing & Finish 1,596.84 

Granite 270.00 

Sand 110.00 

Fence Materials 272.00 

Sitework, Sewer, Moving Bldg. 558.68 

5,000.00 



- 30 - 



FIRE LOSS ADDED EXPENSES-DETAIL 

Moving Expenses 618.50 

Office Fixturea-Repairs/Replacementa 1,802.9ft 

Misc. 51.16 

Signs iiO.OO 

Police Radio Equipment 3,017.85 

Reference Materials 438.76 

Uniforms 187.50 

Telephone 398.70 

Rent 1,050.00 

Estimate of Damages 350.00 

8,025.44 



- 31 - 



REVENUES 



FROM LOCAL TAXES 

Resident Taxes 

National Bank Stock Tax 

Yield Taxes 

Interest/Penalties on Taxes 

Inventory Penalties 

Resident Tax Penalties 

Miscellaneous - Current Use Penalties 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE 

Shared Revenue Block Grant 

Highway Block Grant 

State Aid/Water Pollution 

Business Profits Tax 
LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 

Dog Licenses 

Licenses, Permits, Fees 
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 

Town Offices 

Town Hall 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Dog & Animal Control 

Planning & Zoning 

Care of Trees 

Insurance 

Solid Waste Facility 

Town Dump/Stump Dump 

Storm Sewer Maintenance 

Town Maintenance 

Welfare 

Recreation & Parks 

Debt Service 

Housing Standards Agency 

Fines fi. Restitution 

Employees Benefits 
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 

Interest on Deposits 

Sale of Town Property 

Income From Trust Funds 
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 

Income from Wastewater 

With from Capital Reserve 

Revenue Sharing Fund 

Insurance/Bond Proceeds 



12,620.00 

62. SO 

1 , 790 . 28 

38,292.90 

0.00 

265.00 

2,656.50 

52,292.00 
40,185.92 
56,239.00 
98 , 304 . 39 

122,259.00 
1,442.30 
2,304.00 

153.00 

50.45 

5,644.05 

0.00 

125.00 

728.48 

0.00 

10,030.00 

754.91 

0.00 

0.00 

2,088.97 

860.50 

1,657.04 

150.00 

45.00 

444.00 

22.70 

12,977.03 

1,240.00 

0.00 

59,852.10 
0.00 

44,111.04 
0.00 



TOTAL REVENUES 



569,848.36 



OTHER REVENUES - (Non Tax Rate Related) 

Marriage Licenses payable to State of NH 

Yield Tax Security Deposits 

New Trust Funds 

Tax Anticipation Note Proceeds 



546.00 

4,624.12 

600 . 00 

595,000.00 



- 32 - 



COMPENSATION SCHEDULE 



Position 



1983 
Rate 



1984 
Rate 



1985 
Rate 



Administrative Assistant 
Secretary /Bookkeeper 

Police Chief 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 



16,050 18,300 19,215 

5.14/hr 9,348 5.14/hr 8,341 5.42/hr 11,270 



16,050 
13,375 



17,494 
14,578 



17,494 
14,000 
14,000 



Highway Agent 7.80/hr 

Heavy Equipment Operator 6.15/hr 
H.E. Operator & Mechanic 6.15/hr 
Light Equipment Operator (1) 5.68/hr 
Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 



16,224 8.50/hr 
12,792 6.70/hr 
12,792 6.70/hr 
11,814 6.19/hr 
14,953 



17,684 8.93/hr 18,568 

13,943 7.04/hr 14,640 

13,943 7.04/hr 14,640 

12,877 6.50/hr 13,521 

17.200 18,060 



ELECTED / APPONTED OFFICIALS 



Selectmen (2) 

(Chairman) 
Tax Collector/Town Clerk 
Treasurer 

Trustees (Treasurer) 
Moderator 
Auditors (3) 
Health Officer 
Supervisors of Checklist (3) 

Chairman 
Ballot Clerks (4) 
Overseer of Public Welfare 
Custodian 

Police Officers (Part-Time) 
Fire Chief 

Deputy Fire Chief (2) 
Fire Dept. Line Officers* (7) 
Firefighter 
Firefighter* 
Wastewater Treatment Plant Laborer 

*N.H. Certified Firefighter 

Water Safety Inat. 

Lifeguard 

Attendant-Pool 



a. 1,000 


ea . 1 , 000 


ea. 1,000 


1,200 


1,200 


1.200 


11,200 


11,200 


11.760 


1,250 


1,250 


1,250 


1,250 


1,250 


1,250 


50 


50 


150 


ea. 100 


ea. 100 


ea. 100 


150 


150 


150 


ea. 100 


ea. 125 


ea. 150 


100 


150 


150 


ea. 10 


ea. 10 


ea. 10 


1,200 


1,200 


1,250 


3.50/hr 


3.50/hr 


3.50/hr 


3.75/hr 


4.25/hr 


4.50/hr 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


ea. 500 


ea. 500 


ea. 500 


ea. 300 


ea . 300 


ea. 300 


150 


150 


150 


200 


200 


200 


6.20/hr 


7.00/hr 


6.00/hr 




180/wk 


180/wk 




150/wk 


150/wk 




134/wk 


134/wk 



Tree Warden 



50 



50 



150 



- 33 - 



CARPENTER MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
FINANCIAL REPORT 



General Fund 



Balance January 1, 1964 
RECEIPTS: Town of Pittsfield 
Dog Sled Account 
Fines, Interest, Gifts 



EXPENSES: Salaries 
Oil 

Utilities 
F.I.C.A. & Tax 
Operating Expenses 

Balance December 31, 1984 

Carpenter Trust Fund 

Balance January 1, 1984 
RECEIPTS: Trustees Trust Funds 



EXPENSES: Books and Magazines 



Balance December 31, 1984 
Butler Trust Fund 

Balance January 1, 1984 

RECEIPTS: Froi Trustees 
Bank Interest 



EXPENSES: Encyclopedia 
Balance December 31, 1984 

Lizzie Foote Fund 
Balance January 1, 1984 
RECEIPTS: From Trustees 
Balance December 31, 1984 



13,100.00 

54.69 

374.92 



5, 118.00 

1,711.71 

659.22 

918.72 

1,930.41 



2 , 004 . 38 



1 , 279 . 80 



254.22 



1,746.16 

13,529.61 
15,275.77 



10,336.06 
4,937.71 

431.17 

2 , 004 . 38 
2,435.55 

1,279.80 
1,155.75 

350.60 



62.01 
8.67 


90.68 


249.50 


441.28 
249 . 50 




191.78 



651.44 
254.22 

1,105.66 



- 34 - 



D.A.R. Fund 



Balance January 1, 1984 

RECEIPTS: Glits 

Bank Interest 



EXPENSES i History Awards P.H.S. 
Balance December 31, 1964 

Gertrude Eralsey Ferguson Fund 

Balance January 1, 1984 

RECEIPTS: Dividends 

Bank Interest 

EXPENSES: Books 

Balance December 31, 1984 

Jenkins Room Memorial Fund 

Balance January 1, 1984 

RECEIPTS: Gifts 

Bank Interest 

EXPENSES: Huckina Gil Co. 
Balance December 31, 1984 



224.52 



30.00 
21.10 


51.10 


60.00 


275.62 

50.00 




225.62 



900.29 



619.56 
42.24 


661.80 


875.61 


1,562.09 
875.61 




686.48 



753.30 



425.00 
47.30 


472.30 


232.98 


1,225.60 
232.98 




992.62 



Sybil G. Pease, Treasurer 



- 35 - 



CARPENTER MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



During the past year several meetings were held with other small area 
Libraries to see if the loss of Bookmobile Service could be counter-acted by 
increased local co-operation. Tentative plans are still under consideration; 
Meanwhile we will continue to try and obtain fro* elsewhere any Materials that 
are urgentlly needed by patrons. 

The Library hosted an Open Forum in January, with representatives of Public 
Service of New Hampshire on hand to answer questions. An immensely successful 
talk, sponsored jointly with the Pittsfield Area Arts Council, presented Richard 
Lederer, Concord Monitor columnist in September. 

Instead of the Annual Old Home Day sale, an ongoing sale of paperbacks and 
Library discards was conducted through April and May, which proved equally 
popular. Displays of Cub Scout and Girl Scout activities were featured. Fines 
for overdue books were raised, for the first time in many years, to 5 cents a 
day. 

At the start of the year, long-needed repairs to the furnace were completed, 
which have helped the heating system immeasurably. Since then, the roof, leaking 
badly in several places, has been re-shingled, and the handrail outside the 
Jenkins Room has been fixed. Our thanks to the Selectmen for these investments 
in upkeep. 

During the vacation period Faith Whittier was our capable substitute, 
assisted by June Chase. We appreciate community support and all donations of 
memorial books and gifts throughout the year. 

"If we could get our parents to read to their pre-school children 15 minutes 
a day, we could revolutinize the schools." 

— Ruth Love 



CIRCULATION REPORT 



Adult Books 


5713 


Juvenile Books 


3089 


Periodicals: Adult 


1244 


Juvenile 


120 


Films 


50 


New Books: Adult 


173 


Juvenile 


130 


New Registration: Adult 


143 


Juvenile 


138 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph C. Van Horn 

Sybil Pease 

Agnes Ring 



- 36 - 



PITTSFIELD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

The Pittsfield Center Improvement Program is essentially complete. The one 
remaining activity, the conversion of the brick apartment building on the corner 
of Cram and Carroll Street into three, three bedroom apartments will be about 70* 
complete by the time thia report ia published. Some finishing touches on the 
play equipment at Drake Field and a final audit will close out the Program about 
May, 1985. 

The principal activity completed during 1984 was the reconstruction of the 
Cram Avenue-Broadway Street area. A twenty -five space parking area was created 
on Cram Avenue, which will be owned and maintained by the Pittsfield Center 
Development improvements along lower Broadway Street, resurfacing of both street 
and construction of a sidewalk from Depot Street to Main Street were also major 
parts of the project. 

The Pittsfield Center Development Program began four years ago. The Program 
was totally funded with a Federal Community Development Block Grant in the amount 
of $1,106,000. When the Program is completed this Spring, the following will have 
been accomplished with these funds: 

1. Reconstruction of Main, Chestnut, Green, Elm, Cram, 
Broadway and Broadway Extension streets and sidewalks. 

2. Replacement of storm drainage systems on Chestnut, Main 
Street to Dustin Park and Broadway Extension. 

3. Major renovations to Dustin Park and Drake Field. 

4. Construction of two non-profit, tax paying off street 
parking areas on Elm Street and Cram Avenue. 

5. Construction of the independent, non-profit Blueberry 
Express Day Care Center at Depot Street. 

6. Conversion of three vacant apartment buildings, two on 
Bridge Street and one on Cram Avenue, into first quality, well 
managed family housing. 

7. Establishment of the Pittsfield Center Development 
Corporation, dedicated to encouraging continued improvements in 
the Village Center. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, a part of the administrative funds 
included in the Grant have been set aside to explore the possibility of applying 
for another Grant about June of 1965. The Committee haa accepted the charge to 
hire a consultant to explore the possibility. A report will be made to the Board 
of Selectmen by April of thia year. Hearings will be held on potential projects 
and their makeup if the Board decides to proceed. 

As the current Program winds to a close, we would like to extend our 
gratitude to thoae who took the time to come to the public hearing and meetinga 
to offer their helpful suggestions and comments, for the cooperation and support 
of the Downtown merchants during construction, for the donationa of time and 
equipment, especially at Drake Field and for the general support of the community 
throughout the Program. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Committee: Ann Carpenter Former Members: Connie Boehm 
Leo Fraser, Jr. George Freese 

Patricia A. Freeman Richard Joyce 

John H. Perkins, Jr. Gilbert Paige 

Willis E. Pethic Marilyn Riel 

Arnold L. Wells John Teague 



Edward Young 



Staff: Kenneth L. Anderson, Consulting Director 



- 37 - 



FIRE DEPARTMENT REPORT 

During 1984 the Fire Department answered a total of 276 calls, 203 of these 
were for medical aid. Listed below is a summary of the types of calls handled by 
our Rescue Squad and why they are such a valuable part of our department. 

This past year will be remembered for the fires at the Washington House and 
the Town Hall. These fires gave the people of Pittafield a chance to see our 
Mutual Aid System at work and how a quickly and efficiently they respond to 
render aid. We are fortunate to belong to the Capital Area Compact where help la 
only a call away. We sometimes take our fire department for granted, however, 
when fires of this magnitude occur it is gratifying to know that they can be 
relyed upon to do a very effective 30b at containing them. I would like to say 
at this time "thanks guys for a job well done". We also want to thank the 
employees of some of our Firemen for allowing them, to take time from their jobs 
to help in this effort. During the day when a number of our department meiebers 
are employed out of town, the School Board has allowed us to have our explorers 
excused if we have a fire when they are needed. For this we are very grateful. 

Some activities during the year included our Annual Raffle, dances, serving 
breakfast at the Balloon Rally, and Co-sponaorahip of the Carnival and Parade. On 
Christmas Eve the Rescue Squad sponsored a Santa Claus program where a gift could 
be delivered to your child by "Santa" himself. This project was very well 
received. 

Our Explorers Post still proves to be a valuable part of our department. 
Christmas trees were sold again this year as a money making project for the 
group. 

This past year also saw the installation of the Trophy and Book Case at the 
Station. This case was funded by the department and the Firemens Auxiliary. Some 
of the monies used were given to the Auxiliary in memory of former members. It 
is a fine addition to our meeting room. 

Training sessions and drills were conducted during the year and I would like 
to thank the Auxiliary for always being there when we need them. There help 
during the year is always welcomed and appreciated. 

Our Fire and Medical Emergency Number is 225-3355. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Frederick T. Hast, Chief 



- 38 - 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ROSTER 



Frederick T. Hast, Chief 
John Kidder. Treasurer 



Dana Flanders, Dec Chief 
Douglas Stevens, Dep Chief 



COMPANY NO. 3 

Ernest Harper, Capt 
Roger Flanders, Lt 
Floyd Flanders, Lt 
Gerry Gilman 
Walt Rollins 
Larry Deane 
Robert Freese 
William Small 
James Topham 
Henry Wallace 
Scott White 
James Correll 



COMPANY NO. 4 

Russell Courtemanche, Capt 
John Kidder, Lt 
0. Herbert Emerson, Lt 
Alan Flanders 
John McAuliffe 
Lennie Deane 
David Cheney 
Kenneth Piaaeczny 
Tim Riel 
Dana Elliott 
Robert Bousquet 
David Sweet, Sub 



RESCUE SQUAD 

Robert Bousquet 

Diane Brown 

Kathy Carson 

James Correll 

Lennie Deane, Lt 

Ann Emerson 

Theresa Flanders 

Robert Freese 

Gerry Gilman 

Ernest Harper 

John Kidder 

Jim Topham 

Jeannette Vien 



FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS 



RESCUE CALLS 



RESCUE CALLS 



Box Alarms 


6 


Heart Attack 


11 








CVA 


4 


Chimney 


14 


CPR 


4 








DOA 


4 


M.A. 


17 


Illness 


52 








Trauma 


74 


Service 


16 


0D 


4 








Siezures 


6 


Motor Vehicle 


6 


Maternity 


12 


Breath 


ing 


D 


iff iculty 


12 


Structure 


6 


Motor Vehicle 


18 




Serv 


ice Calls 


2 


Brush/Grass 


8 

















FIRE DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT 



1250 Gallon Pumper (1980) 
750 Gallon Pumper (1964) 
1200 Gallon Tank Truck (1968) 
Forest Fire Truck (1949) 
85 Foot Aerial Ladder (1948) 
Rescue Truck (1969) 
4X4 Forestry Truck (1954) 
14 Ft. Rescue Boat W/Trailer 
Rescue Sled 
0) Scott Air Packs 
Resuscitator 

1000 Watt Lighting System 
Smoke Ejector 
Rescue Saw 
Ice Rescue Suit 
Fold-A-Tank 
Hosewasher 

Hose Drying Hoist & Rack 
3000 Watt Lighting System 



- 39 - 



PITT5FIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The year of 1984 has been a rather busy year for the Pittsfield Police 
Department. 

This, year ended with 9,130 calls through the dispatch system, as you say 
have known the Police Station tried to stay open eight (8) hours per day, which 
generated 1,242 more calls a total of 10,372 calls answered by the Pittsfield 
Police Officers, these are calls made by citizens who may have a complaint to 
file. 

The year ended with a great increase in DWI arrests, which may have saved a 
few lives in the Pittsfield area. 

The year of 1984 did not show a drastic increase in crime in the Town, 
however, there was an increase in Motor Vehicle stops due to incressed efforts to 
decrease accidents in the area. 

As you are all aware there were two real serious problems in the compact 
area in reference to fires. First the Historical Washington House, then the Town 
Hall fire, in which the Police Station was located and totally destroyed. 
However, the station was moved to the south end to the Old Globe Building on the 
second floor snd at no time did the Police Department cease operation. 

The Police Department did however lose much equipment. Thanks to efforts of 
many of the Town citizens the move was made without any problem. Thanks to Mr. 
Frank Lyman the Police Department had a place to operate from. 

The problems involving sex crimes has been on the increase in 1984, however 
it seems to be a state wide problem. 

The year of 1984 has seen changes in personnel. Officer's Edward Hlais and 
James Smith have been added after the departure of Officer's David Mancini and 
George Cote. 

In closing I would like to thank the citizens of Pittsfield, all the Town 
Office personnel, the Police Officer's that I have worked with in both Pittsfield 
and all other agencies and the Town Selectmen. Please remember if you see a crime 
and do not report it, that is also a crime. Please help keep our Town free of 
crime. 



David B. Greenwood 
Chief of Police 



- 40 - 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



The Selectmen would like to report that the new building at the F.B. Argue 

Memorial Pool is greatly appreciated by all the young people that u&e it. 

Although it was not quite ready by the opening of the season, it was finished 
midway through the summer. 

The highway crew moved part of the old building, which is now in use by the 
High School for storage. They also removed the old septic tank, installed the 
new sewer connection, floor drains and foundation drains as well as reinstalled 
the chain link fence. Rene Drolet assisted the highway crew with the water 
service and Joe Carson donated equipment and materials for the site preparation. 

The Selectmen thanks the members of Rotary Club and the Bicentennial 
Committee for the donation of time and funds to mske the project possible. The 
Rotary Club donated many hours to clear the site of brush and grass on both sides 
of the pool which helps keep the water cleaner and makes a neater facility. 

Future plans are to clear more of the site for use as a picnic area with the 
purchase of picnic tables and perhaps building fireplaces for area residents to 
use. Also proposed for 1985 is to open the pool area on Sunday afternoons and to 
offer swimming lesson every weekday morning, weather permitting. 

Once the old pool building was removed the highway department was able to 
finish straightening Clark Street and by early fall the entire street was 
resurfaced. This was accomplished with the funds of the state Highway Block 
Grant. Also using these funds a section of Berry Pond Road was widened and 

straightened. 

Although time and funds did not permit the beginning of the Lyford Hill 
project, pipe materials were purchased with the remaining funds available. The 
project, which is scheduled to get under way this summer , at this time consists 
of installing a new storm and underdrain system to help stabilize the road bed 
and then resurfacing the street. 

Also proposed in the 1985 budget is funding to repair or rebuild the 
Crescent Street retaining wall in order to repair the sidewalk in that area. 
Many alternatives have been discussed as to what to do, including making the 
street one way to provide ample room for the sidewalk without extensive work on 
the retaining wall. Work proposed in that area would also include finishing the 
Water Street sidewalk to River Street. 

In August of this year the Town suffered a tremendous loss with the fire at 
the Town Hall. Although appearances from the street would give one the impression 
that nothing has happened, the building was almost totally rendered useless. The 
Police rooms were destroyed with extensive smoke and water damage to the 
Selectmen's and Town Clerk-Tax Collector's Offices. Parts of the heating system, 
plumbing and electrical service was rendered useless. With some temporary 
electrical and plumbing repairs the District Court is still operating in the 
building. The Second floor received damage to the ceiling and north wall. The 
third floor received extensive damage to northerly rooms ceilings and roof. 

Different cost proposals are being sought for repairing and renovating the 
building and at the same time to try to provide more space that would be adequate 
for all those offices formerly located in the town hall. Funding is proposed in 
the 1985 budget to study snd engineer plans for the town hsll snd the town 
offices requirements. A special town meeting is tentatively proposed for the 
town to decided what to do. 

A settlement with the insurance carrier has been reached after months of 
research and obtaining estimates for damages. A depreciated figure of £89,000 



- 41 - 



was agreed on by the Selectmen and insurance carrier contingent upon acceptance 
by the Town at a public hearing. $7,855 was agreed on, as limited by the policy, 
for damages and extra expenses on the contents. 



1984 TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Automobile Permits 

Title Application Fees 

UCC Filings 

Copy Fees 

Filing Fees 

Dog Licenses 

Dog Licenses Penalties 

Bicycle Registrations 

Federal Tax Liens 

Pole Licenses 



122,259.00 

774.00 

980.00 

90.00 

13.00 

1,442.30 

97.00 

94.00 

8.00 

20.00 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Births 
Marriages 

Deaths 



45 
42 
23 
Respectfully Submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast 
Town Clerk 



- 42 - 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

TOWN OF PITTSFIELD 

March 13, 1964 



Moderator, Henry F. Stapleton, called the meeting to order at 6 p.m. at the 
Greenleaf Auditorium. 

Leo Fraser made a motion we dispense with the first reading of the warrant 
and Arnold Wells seconded. Voted affirmative. 

*?II9yL*^i T° choose all necessary Town Officers for the year ensuing. 

Moderator read the results of the election of officers which took place 
earlier in the day. 

At this time, Leo Fraser asked if the voters present would rather recess the 
meeting until Thursday night because of the snowstorm. Show of hands indicated 
the voters present would rather continue on with the meeting tonight. 

A?II?y=_*?- To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to apply for, accept and expend money from the State, Federal or any other 
Governmental unit or private source which becomes available during the year in 
accordance with the provisions set forth in RSA 31t9S-b. Such authorization to 
include the purchase of property with the aforementioned funds. 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the article as read and Arnold Wells seconded. 
Voice vote affirmative. 

^?II?yi_*§i To fiee *■* tne Town wlii vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell, 
rent, or lease any or all property acquired by Tax Collector's Deeds, or any 
other source, and to administer said property as they deem in the best interests 
of the Town. 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the article as read and Terry Robinson seconded. 
Voice vote affirmative. 

*?I*?t§_?l± T° see if the Town will vote to authorize prepayment of property 
taxes and to authorize the Tax Collector to accept prepayments as provided by R5A 
80:S2-a. 

Patricia Fraser moved we accept the article as read and John Stapleton 
seconded. Voice vote affirmative. 

ARTICLE #5 ± To see if the Town will vote to authorize the selectmen to 

borrow money in anticipation of 1984 taxes, the same to be repaid with that year 
ievy . 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the article as read and Frank Lyman seconded. 
Voice vote affirmative. 

A?IICLE_#6 i To see if the Town will vote to require the Selectmen to provide 
and furnish written minutes of all public meetings and hearings associated with 
Town functions, and to require the selectmen to retsin snd maintain for public 
view all minutes for such public meetings and hearings for a period of not leas 
than ten (10) years from the date(s) of such public meetings or hearings. (By 
petition) 

James Blake moved we accept the article as read and Kenneth Dams seconded. 

Leo Fraser read RSA 91a: 2 regarding minutes being recorded and open for 
public inspection. Since there is already an RSA requiring minutes to be kept on 



- 43 - 



file, he felt this article could serve no purpose. 

Susan Bleckmann asked when this RSA was passed. 

Leo Fraser aald it waa paaaed in 1967 and amended in 1971 and again in 1975. 

Susan Bleckmann asked why all records were not kept on file. 

Leo Fraaer aald he knew for the paat three years, since he had been on the 
Board, that all records had been kept. He realized that some minutes regarding 
the sewer project were missing, but stated ao far the Selectmen have been unable 
to locate them. 

David Adams said that when Mr. Mann waa the Administrative Assistant, he 
used to have the Selectmen's minutes of their meetings published in the Suncook 
Sun. If there waa no cost involved, he would like to see these articles 
continued. 

Leo Fraser felt it was a good suggestion and would make sure the articles 
were printed in the paper. 

After considerable discussion, the Moderator ruled we would take no action 
on this Article, because in hia opinion the State RSA 91a: 2 auperaedea thia 
article. 

ABII?WI_*Zjl T° see if the Town will vote to require the Town Moderator to 
recognise the Chairman, Pittsfield Budget Committee, or his designee, prior to 
recognition of any other persons, for the purpose of presenting Budget Committee 
recommendations relative to appropriations of moneys for payment of Town 
expenses. (By petition) 

Gordon Weldon asked if someone who signed the petition would explain what 
prompted thia article. 

Susan Bleckmann felt that we appoint a Budget Committee consisting of 
interested taxpayers, who work many houra in preparing a budget figure that they 
feel will be acceptable to the Town and therefore, they should be allowed to 
present their facts and figures first. 

Moderator questioned whether this article is constitutional. He referred to 
the minutes of last year's town meeting regarding the budget figure article, and 
noted that Chester Francis, Chairman of the Budget Committee, made the motion to 
accept the budget committee's figure. He further stated it was not his intention 
to ignore anyone who wished to be heard. 

Leo Fraser felt this petition suggested the Moderator wasn't conducting a 
fair and open meeting, and in his opinion the Moderator gives everyone an 
opportunity to speak, if they so desire. 

Since there was no motion on this article, Moderator ruled we would pass 
over Article #7. 

ARTICLE #8 A To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and authorize the 

withdrawal from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds for use as set-offs against 
budgeted appropriations for the following specific purposes and in amounta 
indicated herewith or take any action hereon: 

A. Financial Audit for Fiacal Year 1983 S 5,000.00 

B. Highway Truck-1 ton 4X4 20,000.00 

C. Capital Reserve Fund-Highway Equipment 10,000.00 

D. Capital Reserve Fund-Municipal Building-Renovation/ 

Construction 7,000.00 



- 44 - 



E. Capital Reserve Fund-Police Cruiser ^i^CkOO 

046,606.00 

(Recommended by Budget Committee) 

William Bleekmann loved we accept the article as written and it was duly 
seconded. 

Gordon Weldon asked for an explanation of "A". 

Mark Fraser said this audit la required every three years by the Federal 
Government. Any town that receives in excess of $25,000 for three consecutive 
years must have this audit in order to continue receiving federal revenue sharing 
money. 

Charles Watson asked why we needed a new one ton truck. 

Nark Fraser said last year we spent approximately $5,000 on rental of a 
pickup truck and this year would be around $6,000. This truck is used to sand 
sidewalks, pick up limbs, brush, etc. A new truck would be equipped with plow 
and sander. 

After short discussion. Moderator moved the question. Voice vote 
affirmative. 

A?II?ki_*§i To aee if tne Town w111 vote to authorize the estsblishment of 
the following Cspital Reserve Funds contigent upon the approval of the use of 
Revenue Sharing Funds: 

A. Highway Equipment $10,000.00 

B. Municipal Building-Renovation/Conatruction 7,000.00 

C. Police Cruiser 3,500.00 

(Recommended by the Budget Committee) 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the article as read and it was duly seconded. 

Question was raised regarding the Municipal Building renovation. 

Leo Fraser said at the present time we are awaiting an inspection of the 
Town Hall due to the fact that the State now manages the affairs of the 
Pittafield District Court 100*. They are presently setting up guidelines as to 
what la required to bring our court up to the minimum requirements to be 
accreditated. As long as there is a sincere effort on the part of the community 
over a period of years to meet the necessary requirements, our court won't be 
jeopardized. It took a long, hard fight by Judge uiddia, Senator Freeae and 
others to get this District Court, and we wouldn't want to loose it. 

Fraaer further stated we have to provide the apace and maintenance of the 
building for the court, however, the State will pay fair rent for the uae of the 
building. We already know of two requirements that will have to be complied 
with: (1) Judge will have to have hia own chambers and (2) Police Department will 
have to be moved out of the building. 

Victor Huse asked about "A" Highway Equipment for $10,000 and, also, what 
happened to the tractor that waa purchaaed laat year? 

Mark Fraser said this $10,000 is to be added to the $10,000 voted last year 
and will be used for a loader or grader when it becomes time to replace them. 

Fraser further stated the Town purchased a tractor which was used all summer 
in Dustin Park, Common on South Mam Street and the pool. Hope to purchase a 
sickle bar for this tractor so they can cut small weeds and brush beside the 



- 45 - 



roads. 

Charles Watson noted the school has requested a tractor in their budget and 
questioned why the Town and School couldn't use the same tractor and save the 
Town money. 

Lengthy discussion followed and it was suggested a schedule be set up so 

that both the school and town could use it. Selectmen felt it would create 

problems since the Town uses it most every day, and there would be little time 
left for the school . 

Discussion indicated that those present felt it would help the Town finances 
if the Selectmen and the School Board Members got together in their planning. 
Leo Fraaer said it would be very difficult to plan budgets together, because the 
Selectmen and the School Board have entirely different sets of guidelines to 
follow in their planning. 

Voice Vote on Article #9 affirmative. 

A?I*9k§_*i9^ To aee lf tne Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of NINE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($9,000.00) for the purpose of dust control on the dirt 
roads using calculm chloride. (Not recommended by Budget Committee) 

Steven Davis moved the article to tabled and John Stapleton seconded. Voice 
vote affirmative. 

ARTICLE_#ll i To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sums 
of money recommended by the Budget Committee to defray Town expenses for the year 
ensuing or pass any motion related thereto. 

Cheater Francis made a motion we accept the figure of 376§i43S 1 GG as 
recommended by the Budget Committee. Leo Fraser seconded the motion. 

Chester Francis explained in detail each item that was cut by the Budget 
Committee and how they arrived at their final figure. 

After a brief discussion, a voice vote on this article was affirmative. 

ARTICLE_#12 i To see if the Town will vote to amend the Municipal Ordinance 
to add the following chapter: 

Preamble: For the purpose of ensuring compliance with the applicable state 
statutes and regulations and town ordinance establishing standards for the 
construction of residential and commercial buildings within the Town of 
Pittsfield and for reasons of public health, safety and general welfare, the Board 
of Selectmen hereby enact the following ordinance by authority conferred by 
Chapter 41, Section 8, New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, and by every 
other authority thereto enabling. 

i.l_5i§trict3 

For purposes of this ordinance the entire Town of Pittsfield is considered 
as a single, undivided district. 

2«.l_Ap.p.lication i All persons must obtain a "Building Permit" from the Board 
of Selectmen before commencing the construction or erection of any type of 
commercial or residential building or structure or additions thereto. 

2i2_Rgad_Reguirements i No building permit will be issued for construction on 
any Class VI road that is closed subject to gates and bars; nor on any non town 



- 46 - 



maintained road, private or public. unless such road is constructed or 
reconstructed to state TRA specifications or such specifications designated by 
the Town of Pittsfield. 

3_5pecif icPrgvisions 

In order to obtain a Building Permit, the following requirements must first 
be met: 

^l.ApplicatiorK Filling out and submitting to the Board of Selectmen an 
application form for a Building Permit. 

^i^Appr^ya^byHealth ^fPfE^ment^ Approval by the Board of Health and 

Health Officer of plans for sewage disposal. 

3 ± 3 _Site PlanReguired. Filing with the Board of Selectmen of a site plan 

showing in reasonable detail boundaries, existing structures, the location of the 
proposed construction, the location of existing and proposed sewage disposal 
systems and the location of any sources of water, including town water, any 
wells, streams or surface water. 

3 i 4_Sewage_5ystej5_Apprgval i Filing with the Board of Selectmen a copy of the 
approval by the New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission for 
the proposed sewage disposal system together with a copy of the plana submitted 
to the Commission for approval. 

^i^A^d^tion^lIteguirements^ All sewage disposal systems must conform to the 
requirements established by the Commission. Where the public health and welfare 
may be involved, the Board of Health may require additional construction in 
addition to the requirements of the Commission 

?i§_Qtb§r_Cgnstructign i All other construction without water or sewage, such 
as sheds, garages and similar construction shall require a site plan unless such 
construction is an addition to an existiong structure. 

3^7 Cgnversigns^ Conversion of existing structures to residential or 

commercial use or expansion of existing residential or commercial structures 
shall require a Building Permit if the conversion or expansion involves the 
creation of additional living units with additional use of water and the existing 
sewage disposal sytsem. 

Driveways 

4^1 Definitign^ Any proposed access road from any lot of land to a public 

road, to be used for any type of vehicular traffic. 

4 i 2__Aggrgval ^eguiredi Written approval, hereinafter called a "Driveway 
Permit", shall be required for the issuance of a building permit as set forth in 
this chapter. A Driveway Permit shall be required in all instances whether or 
not construction of any type of structure is proposed where a building permit is 
required. 

^^^ReguirementSi Construction of any driveway to a public road, whether 
closed or open to public use, shall require approval from the Road Agent of the 
Town of Pittsfield as to placement of said road, necessary drainage, culverts, 
and any other reasonable requirement as may be deemed necessary by the Road 
Agent. 

§_Ere^Ex^sting_Cgnditions 

If a lawful structure exists when this ordinance is enacted which should not 
be allowed under the provisions of this ordinance, the same way nevertheless by 



- 47 - 



continued ao long aa It remains otherwlae lawful and in compliance with the 
applicable atatuea and regulationa in effect. 

^ii_y0i?yiy^_9??yE!§0?Xi Until the Board of Selectmen has aproved a Building 
Permit, which the Board will not do until the foregoing requirements have been 
met, occupancy of a structure subject to this ordinance shall be unlawful and a 
violation under New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 625. 

§i?_!l!9^i??_9i_yi9i§^i9Di ** tne Board of Selectmen become aware of a 
violation of this ordinance, it shall cauae a notification of such violation to 
be served upon the person or persons committing the violation, stating the 
essential facts of the violation. After the date of service of said notice each 
day thereafter shall constitute a separate violation ao long as the violation 
continues. The maximum fine for each violation is defined in New Hampshire 
Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 651, and or as set forth in Chapter One of 
the MUNICIPAL ORDINANCE. 

7_Fees 

The fee for each Building Permit shall be Ten Dollars (310.00) payable at 
the time of application for the permit. 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the article as read and James Blake seconded. 

Leo Fraser said a typographical error appears in #S Pre-Existing Conditions. 
The middle part of the sentence should read.... the same may nevertheless be 
continued so long..... 

Leo Fraser said the reason for this proposed building ordinance la to 
require people to obtain a building permit for construction, ao the Selectmen can 
have some control of the building in the community. They are also greatly 
concerned about the growing health problema in the Town. People are building 
shacks, moving in trailers, etc. with no water and sewage systems. 

Lengthy discussion followed with several questions regarding the State laws 
pertaining to sewage systems. Several felt that we should already be protected 
by existing State laws governing sewage ayatema, but if the State laws in effect 
now aren't being enforced, what good would thia article do. 

Steven Davis said the State has specific guidelines to follow for a sewage 
system, but they don't send an inapector to view every site. They take the 
recommendation of the person doing the job, therefore, there are many systems not 
up to State standarda. 

Discussion continued with several voicing their concern about the article 
being a atep towards zoning. Some felt it would be a good way to protect their 
property, while others definitely felt, if this article passed, we would loose 
our freedom to choose where and how we would live. 

Article #12 defeated by a voice vote. 

A?I*?t§_*i§.i To fiee if tfte Town wiii vote to accept the following Trust 
Funds for perpetual care of the following lots at Floral Park Cemetery: 
William H. Dodge lot by Gladys E. Dodge $300.00 

Frank & Ida B. Wheeler lot by Mrs. Gladys Wheeler 3200.00 

Walter Hall lot by Audrey Cate 3 25.00 

William Hammen lot by Bertha Hammen S 25.00 

Silas Page lot by Dolores and Gerald Gilman $200.00 

French and Green lot by Truatees of Trust Funds S 30.00 



- 48 - 



Leo Fraser made a motion we accept the article as read and it was duly 
seconded. Voice vote affirmative. 

ARIICLE_#14 i Moderator read the article as printed in the Town Report. Steve 
Davis moved we accept the article as read and it was duly seconded. 

Leo Fraser said the Town has six mobile homes which the Selectmen feel are 
in violation of the Mobile Home Ordinance. The Selectmen referred these 6 cases 
to a local attorney for him to review and take whatever legal action is 
necessary. After he reviewed the Ordinance in conjunction with the files we 
turned over to him, he made the recommended changes in the Ordinance that are 
incorporated in the Town Report. 

There was some concern on the part of the Selectmen if these changes were in 
the best interest of the Mobile Home Ordinance. We did not have time to do 
further research because the Town Report has to be at the printers in order for 
it to be completed in time for the Annual Meeting. The Selectmen decided to print 
Article #14 with the amendments recommended by our attorney and then do further 
research. After examination, the Selectmen would like to propose the following 
amended version of the Pittsfield Mobile Home Ordinance amendment as printed in 
the Town Report. 

ARTICLE_#14 i To see if the Town will vote to amend the Mobile Home Ordinance 
adopted on April 3, 1973 as follows: 

1. Add the following provision as a new paragraph at the end of Section IX 



"Written approval must be obtained from the Health Officer prior 
to construction or operation of any sewage and waste disposal systems 
not requiring approval from the New Hampshire Water Supply and 
Pollution Control Commission, i.e., self-contained toilets with out 
running water, including privies and portable chemical toilets". 

2. Delete Section X - Action by Board, and replace with the following: 

SECTION X-APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

1. Application for permits shall be made, in writing, to the Planning Board 
prior to maintaining, establishing , stationing or parking a mobile home or 
trailer for dwelling purposes. The application shall conform to the 
specifications contained in this Ordinance, shall be on the form supplied by the 
Planning Board and shall be accompanied by an application fee, as set by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

2. The Planning Board, before taking formal action, may hold discussions 
with the applicant, and may confer with Town officials and other parties relative 
to the application, at the next regular or special meeting of the Planning Board, 
if needed. The Board shall communicate, in writing, to the applicant specific 
changes, if any which it will require to the application as a prerequisite to the 
approval of the application. 

3. The Board shall act upon applications within sixty days after receipt 
thereof by the Secretary of the Board. All decisions of the Board on application 
shall be in writing. When an application is denied, the reasons shall be set 
forth specifically. 

Leo Fraser moved we accept the amended version as read and John Barto 
seconded. Voice vote affirmative. 

Dan Coolidge made a motion we amend the amended version as follows: 



- 49 - 



Section X-#l. Add the following at the end of #1.... Board of Selectmen, 
which fee shall not exceed ten dollars. Application shall be deemed received at 
the next regular meeting of the Planning Board following submission. 

Section X-#3. Add the following at the end of #3.... When an application is 
denied, the reason and factual basis therefor shall be set forth specifically in 
writing. Any application which is not acted upon within the required sixty days 
shall be deemed approved and a permit shall be issued thereon forthwith. 

Amended motion was duly seconded and voice vote affirmative. 

A?IICLE_#15^ To transact any other business which may legally come before 
this meeting. 

Peggy Weldon asked why Leo Fraser was the only Selectmen present at this 
meeting. Leo answered that Joe was plowing snow and Saul was home because of the 
snowstorm. 

John Barto made a motion we adjourn and Arnold Wells seconded. Vote 
affirmative at 10:16 p.m. Officers present were sworn in. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast, Town Clerk 



- 50 - 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN THE TOWN OF PITTSFIELD, N.H 
For the Year ending December 31, 1964 



DATE PLACE 

Jan 21 Pittafleld 



NAME 



Robert D. Landry Jr. 
Shelly R. Nash 



BY WHOM MARRIED 

D. Griffin Duncan 
Paator 



Mar 3 Pittsfield 



Joseph M. Milano 
Anita Paria 



Paul B. Lane 
Justice of the Peace 



May 5 Ch i cheater 



Philip R. Longval 
Patty A. Turner 



Edward H. Frekey 
Justice of the Peace 



12 Pittsfield 



John J. Quattrucci 
Kendra S. Hast 



Rev. Dr. Vincent Fischer 
Clergyman 



12 Pittsfield 



Scott J. White 
Dawna E. Drew 



Rev. Arlington E. Wry 
Ordained Clergyman 



25 Chichester 



John P. Morrisaette 
Carol L. Cochran 



Edward H. Frekey 
Justice of the Peace 



Jun 2 Pittsfield 



Gabriel T. delaTorre 
Judy A. Simoneau 



Rev. Richard Giroux 
Paator 



2 Northwood 



Anthony G, Tepper 
Donna M. Brasley 



Rev. Richard Giroux 
Pastor 



16 Hampton 



Scott A. King 
Catharine F. Ward 



Rev. Richard P. Don 
Ordained Clergyman 



30 Loudon 



Richard R. Sittig 
Lori A. Sweeney 



Rev. Bryce R. Whiting 
Reverend 



30 Pittsfield 



Kevin E. Gage 
Laurie A. Deane 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



July 7 Pittsfield 



Danny C. McKenaie 
Carol J. Sillara 



Roy I Bohanan 
Ordained Miniater 



14 Pittsfield 



James P. Hilton 
Carol Berubee 



Charles M. Morgan 
Minister 



17 Alton 



Carl R. Hussey 
Martha A. Freese 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



2B E. Concord 



Leonard E. Deane, II 
Bonnie J. Hasblett 



Doanld E. Moore 
Clergyman 



Aug 4 Chichester 



William H. Farmer 
Mary S. Demera 



Edward H. Frekey 
Justice of the Peace 



4 New Durham 



Kenneth A. Twitehell 
Heidi E. Bedell 



Rev. James M. Nason 
Pastor 



10 Chichester 



George A. Emerson 
Judy L Shattock 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergymn 



- 51 - 



Marriages - continued 



Aug 11 Chichester 



Stephen T. Goralski 
Wendy L. Leavitt 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



18 Pittsfield 



Paul D. Bertogli 
Tammie J. Reece 



Charles B. Bentley 
Ordained Minister 



16 Concord 



18 Pittsfield 



Brian P. Milano 
Holly J. Paris 

Michael G. Pszonowsky 
Beatrice K. Davis 



Daniel J. Messier 
Catholic Priest 

Charles M. Morgan 
Minister 



18 Pittsfield 



Gerald E. Gilbert 
Maryann E. Phillips 



Daniel S. Coolidge 
Justice of the Peace 



18 Pittsfield 



Roland E. Privey 
Mary J. Bergatrom 



Richard A. Purdy 
Justice of the Peace 



25 Pittsfield 



Christopher R. Bowman 
Nora F. Bouchard 



Rev. Richard Giroux 
Pastor 



25 Pittsfield 



Edward Cantara, Jr. 
Rose Marie Price 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



Sept 1 Pittsfield 



Michael J. Huard 
Tina-Lee Munn 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



9 Northwood 



Allan S. Jordan 
Julie M. Levine 



Rev. Walter T.Steenaon 
Pastor 



15 Pittsfield 



Mark C. Sargent 
Darlene R. Hebert 



Rev. Richard Giroux 
Pastor 



16 Alton 



John D. Stapleton 
Cecile M. R. Morin 



Gwendolyn M. Jones 
Justice of the Peace 



22 Pittsfield 



George M. Bachelder 
Diane M. Beaudoln 



Gilbert S. Paige 
Justice of the Peace 



Oct 13 Newbury 



Brian F. Bush 
Tammy A. Riley 



Emily B. Geoghegan 
Reverend 



13 Pittsfield 



James S. Hillsgrove 
Gloria H. Pszonowsky 



Charles M. Morgan 
Minister 



19 Epsom 



Jay A. Sargent 
Elaine M. Dumond 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Clergyman 



20 Pittsfield 



Christopher J. Carson 
Penny L. Bedell 



James C. Carson 
Reverend 



27 Pittsfield 



Timothy E. Riel 
Theresa A. Lopez 



James C. Carson 
Reverend 



- 52 - 



Marriages - continued 



Nov 23 Pittsfield 



Dec 8 Chichester 



15 Pittsfield 



24 Epson 



Daniel S. Coolidqe 
Carolyn M. Stiles 

Karl L. Nilges, Jr. 
Ann M. Roy 

David E. Jette 
Lorraine Y. Cutting 

William J. Quinlan 
Nancy C. Stone 



Charles H. Morgan 
Minister 

Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Minister 

Daniel S. Coolidqe 
Justice of the Peace 

Walter W. White 
Justice of the Peace 



25 Pittsfield Howard S. Waddle 
Tina M. Vien 



Linda L. Turner 
Justice of the Peace 



25 Chichester Kenneth G. Sawyer, Sr 
Lorinda C. Stevens 



Rev. H. Franklin Parker 
Minister 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast, Town Clerk 



DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE TOWN OF PITTSFIELD. N.H. 
For the Year ending December 31, 1984 



DATE NAME 

Jan 1 Wendy M. Bean 
14 George E. Weaver 

Feb 8 Charles E. Green 
10 Ruth V. Chase 
19 John G. Lomananey 

Apr 1 Bertha A. Eastman 

8 Burdette W. Gallup 

9 Henry R. Murray, III 
May 3 Stanley Kliszewski 

4 Bjorn Norman Weatgard 
4 Emily P. Barton 
Jun24 Robert J. Barnett 
Jul 8 Arthur P. Raymond 
18 Mary E. Stevens 
24 Rene J. Maxfield 
29 Frederick Wagner 
Augl2 Abbiegail T. Feldman 

31 Ethel Boisvert 
Oct 4 Mildred B. Parkhurat 

17 Ruth C. Emerson 
Novl5 Warren G. Reed 
Decl9 Richard H. Stuart 
23 Ezra J. 0' Barton 



PLACE 






Laconia 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Pittsfield 

Pittsfield 

Concord 

Concord 

Pittsfield 

Manchester 

Concord 

Pittsfield 

Hanover 

Concord 

Concord 

Manchester 

Concord 

Pittsfield 

Concord 

Concord 

Pittsfield 

Concord 

Pittsfield 



AGE 

13 
75 
87 
80 
50 
70 
65 
34 
73 
77 
71 
74 
77 
93 
72 
62 
75 
73 
79 
72 
68 
69 
79 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast, Town Clerk 



- 53 - 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN THE TOWN OF PITTSFIELD 



DATE 



Jan 


1 




4 




18 




18 




20 




31 


Feb 


4 




8 




23 




26 


Mar 


3 




22 


Apr 


6 




9 




23 


Hay 


8 




25 


June 


8 




14 




16 




17 




30 


July 


2 




3 




8 




16 




24 




25 


Aug 


6 




10 




21 




21 




22 


Sept 


3 




4 




6 




13 




24 




26 


Oct 


17 


Nov 


20 




21 


Dec 


2 




13 




17 




30 



PLACE 

Concord 

Portsmouth 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Manchester 

Laconla 

Concord 

Concord 

Manchester 

Concord 

Hanover 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Hanover 

Concord 

Concord 

Manchester 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Pittafield 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 



NAME OF CHILD 

Megan Beth Williams 

David Paul Wilson, II 

Travia Charles Smith 

Derek Aubrey Maxfield 

Amanda Marie Macneil 

Shawna Rowena Snedeker 

Jennifer Marie Landry 

Raymond Scott Hlggina, Jr. 

John Robert McAuliffe 

Magen Elizabeth Vien 

Caleb Michael Horn 

Monica Rose Glick 

Travia Lee French 

Steven Michael Miner 

Fred Daniel Emerson, Jr. 

Chris Melas 

Eric William Smith 

Elise Marie Houle 

William Michael Butterworth, Jr, 

Joseph Harold Darrah 

Christopher Michael Sherman 

Michelle Marie Gonzalez 

Joshua Mark Hodgdon 

Andrew Peter Dunne 

LeGrande Arthur Smith 

Jessica Lynn Bennenghove 

Stephanie Elizabeth Carr 

Melisa Ruth Gunther 

Chrissy Mae Place 

Amber Marie Carr 

Austin Carl Leduc 

Andrea Jean Foater 

Steven Joel Smith 

Corrin Holmes 

Zacharlah Andrew Johnson 

Alicia Lillian Locke 

Sarah May Longval 

Zachary Wayne Emerson 

Thomaa Sidney Leduc, Jr. 

Cynthia Marie Rogers 

Curtes Lea Chase 

Sonya Rose Drew 

Jesse Nobu Buzzell 

Jessica Marie Remillard 

Matthew Charles Kogler, Jr. 

James Douglas Kimball, III 



- 54 - 



For the Year ending December 31, 1984 



NAME OF FATHER 

Richard Lyle Williams 
David Jonathan Wilson 
Michael Charles Smith 
Aubrey Joseph Maxfield 
Douglas John Macneil 
Anthony Lee Snedeker 
Robert David Landry, Jr. 
Raymond Scott Higgins, Sr. 
John Thomas McAuliffe 
Edward Louis Vien 
Joseph Fredrick Horn 
Samuel Hamilton Glick 
Bozzie Bill French 
Harold Ashley Miner, Jr. 
Fred Daniel Emerson 
James Melas 
William Erville Smith 
Edward Gerard Houle 
Wiiliam Michael Butter worth, Si- 
Harold Eugene Darrah, Jr. 
Michael William Sherman 
Donald Roul Gonzalez 
John Fitzgerald Hodqdon 
John James Dunne, Sr. 
Bryan Lee Smith 
James Joseph Benninghove 
Garry Arthur Carr 
Joseph Michael Gunther 
Harry Daniel Place, Jr. 
Carl Philip Carr 
Carl Edward Leduc 
George Foster 
Harold Edmond Smith 
Fred Bowman Holmes 
Peter Andrew Johnson 
Dana Ralph Locke 
Philip Roger Longval, Sr. 
Wayne Wallace Emerson 
Thomas Sidney Leduc 
Stephen Kelly Rogers, Sr. 
Darryl Owen Chase 
Thomas Edward Drew, Sr. 
David Kevin Buzzell 
Paul Lucien Remillard 
Matthew Charles Kogler 
James Douglas Kimball, Jr. 



MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER 

Holly Ann Durivage 
Jennifer Marie Hans 
Mary Ann Thibedau 
Barbara Rita Smith 
Debra Jo Sargent 
Susan Diane Lank 
Shelly Rae Nash 
Pearl Lora Frost 
Elaine Clair Weeks 
Nancy Ann ChaDman 
Susan Lorraine Ramsey 
Linda Ann Houle 
Elizabeth Ann Dutton 
Donna Jean Webber 
Sandra Jane Clough 
Vasiliki Magerias 
Naomi Ellen Elliott 
Joan Marie Goodale 
Rosemary Bartrum 
Deborah Ann Quinn 
Mary Christine Bradbury 
Deborah June Fife 
Marilyn Fay Hartshorn 
Judith Anne Coucci 
Claudia Pepper Rentschler 
Deborah Lynn Schroth 
Tammy Jean Baxter 
Donna Mae Snedeker 
Donna Mae McCormack 
Catherine Marie Messier 
Barbara Anne Flanders 
Margaret Ann Messier 
Mellnda Ann Joy 
Sheila Durkan 
Susan Ellen Morrissette 
Deborah Ruth LaCaase 
Patti Anne Turner 
Elaine Anne Francis 
Janet Elaine Nutter 
Diandra Jeanetta Walker 
Debbie Lellitha Walker 
Terrie Joan Troughton 
Elizabeth Torn! Yamashiro 
Lucie Anne Marie Plourde 
Robin Dean Whittier 
Alice Marie Richards 



Respectfully submitted, 
Elizabeth A. Hast, Town Clerk 



- 55 - 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

School District 

of 

PITTSFIELD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



1983 — 1984 



INDEX 



I. ADMINISTRATION AND REPORTS Page 

A. Officers of the District and Administration 59 

B. Report of Annual District Meeting 60 

C. Report of the Cooperative School District 66 
Planning Committee 

D. Report of the Superintendent of Schools 68 

E. Report of Middle /High School Principal 72 

F. Report of Elementary School Principal/ 

Reading Coordinator 74 

G. Report on Special Education 76 
H. Report of Education Fifty-One Consortium 78 
I. Report of Chapter 1 83 
J. Report on School Health Services 84 
K. Report of Staff Development Committee 85 
L. Report of the Drake Field Programs 86 

II. INSTRUCTIONAL AND SUPPORT STAFF ROSTERS 88 

III. FINANCE 

A. Report of School District Treasurer 
(Including Auditor's Certificate) 

B. Annual Audit 1983-84 91 

C. Report on Internal Accounting Controls 108 

D. Report on Compliance H3 

E. Salary of S.A.U. Personnel 116 

IV. PUPIL STATISTICS 

A. Enrollment, Elementary School 117 

B. Enrollment, Middle /High School 118 

V. 1985 ANNUAL MEETING 

A. Warrant: Election of School Officials H" 

B. Warrant: Annual School District Meeting 120 

C. 1985-86 School Budget 121 

D. 1985-86 School Calendar 123 



- 5« - 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT # 51 
Pittsfield School District 

OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT AND ADMINISTRATION 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



Henry F. Stapleton 
Roberta J. Maxfield 



SCHOOL BOARD 



Thomas E. Marston, Chairman 
Edward G. Young, Vice Chairman 
John Genest 
Sally Bartels 
Arthur Morse 



TREASURER 



S.A.U. # 51 



Superintendent of Schools 

Business Administrator 

Executive Secretary 

Accounting Clerk 

Clerk-Typist 

Food Service Bookkeeper 

Administrative Assistant 

Bookkeeper 

Chapter 1 Coordinator 



Term Expires 1987 

Term Expires 1985 

Term Expires 1985 

Term Expires 1986 

Term Expires 1986 

Elaine A. Emerson 



F. Andre' Paquette 
Wayne W. Emerson 
Sue J. Brown 
Robin H. Berg 
Dorothy Flammia 
Sallyanne Blanchette 
Claire F. Jerlinski 
Susan L. Heger 
Catherine Hamblett 



- 59 - 



TOWN OF PITTSFIELD 
ANNUAL SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 



On March 22, 1984 the Annual School District Meeting was held at the Greenleaf 
Auditorium. Moderator, Henry Stapleton, called the meeting to order at 8:p.m. 

Robert Winchester moved we dispense with the first reading of the warrant. 
Motion duly seconded and voted affirmative. 

Article I. 



"I move that the District vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $375,000 for the 
construction of alterations and renovations to the Pittsfield High School for originally 
equipping and furnishing said alterations and renovations including the purchase of a 
new boiler and heating system, for site development, for architectural and other service 
fees, and for any other items incidental to or necessary for said construction, alterations, 
renovations; that said funds be raised by the issuance or sale of bonds or notes on the 
credit of the Pittsfield School District in accordance with the provisions of RSA Chapter 
33, as amended; that the District authorize the Pittsfield School Board to invest said 
monies and to use the interest earned thereon for said project; that the District authorize 
the Pittsfield School Board to obtain state, federal and other aid that may be available; 
that the District authorize the Pittsfield School Board to determine the time and place 
of payment of principal and interest, the rate of interest, the provisions for the sale 
of notes and/or bonds, and all other matters in connection therewith." Chester Francis 
made the motion seconded by Robert Winchester. 

Ed Young spoke on behalf of the School Board and explained how the Board had done 
considerable work in reducing the original bond figure of $500,000 to the present figure 
of $375,000. They asked local contractors for bids and cut the administrative costs by 
having the Clerk of Works position filled by the present Director of Maintenance. He 
further explained the differences in each item from the original estimates. 

Maureen VanHorn spoke in favor of the bond. She stated that the repairs are long 
overdue and will eventually have to be taken care of, and the longer we wait the more it 
will cost. 

Leonard Gilman asked why we can't use the town equipment to resurface the school 
driveways and make repairs to the P.E. field. 

Ed Young said this was a good idea, but scheduling of the equipment would be a 
problem. 

Discussion continued and one big concern seemed to be the effect of this bond on 
the tax rate - term of the bond if passed and the percentage rate of interest available. 

Chester Francis said it is up to the School Board to make the final decision on the 
term, but he gave the following options which he stated were only approximate because 
at this time the actual percentage of loans is not known. 



- 60 - 



Pittsfield School District Meeting 
March 22, 1984 
Page 2 



15 Year Term 



$1.77 increase in tax rate first year down to $.80 last year. 
Interest would be $280,000. (75% of total) 

10 Year Term 



$2.06 increase in tax rate first year down to $1.20 last year. 
Interest would be $180,000. (47% of total) 

5 Year Term 



$2.97 increase in tax rate first year down to $2.31 last year. 
Interest would be $87,000. (23% of total) 

1 Year Plan 

$10.71 increase in tax rate for one year. 

Charles Watson asked if we pass this bond issue do we have a guarantee that 
Barnstead students will still come here to school? 

Ed Young stated there was no guarantee since there has never been any contract 

signed with Barnstead. He further stated he felt there should be some sort of contract 

and depending upon the outcome of this bond, they planned to work very closely with 
the Barnstead Board towards a workable solution. 

Linden Cram asked what amount of tuition Barnstead paid to Pittsfield per student 
and how many Barnstead students do we presently have. 

Wayne Emerson said in the year that just ended the tuition was $2,050. per student 
and they were estimating no more than $2,350. per student for next year. At the present 
time in the High School there are 181 Pittsfield students and 120 Barnstead students. 

Moderator announced the School Board had received a petition signed by 175 students 
asking the voters to pass the bond issue and "save our schools". 

Questions continued to be raised about what the term of the bond would be if 
passed. 

Moderator said if the bond issue passes the School Board would meet with the Budget 
Committee and determine a term. 

Moderator announced we would be voting by written ballot on the bond amount of 
$375,000. He further stated the polls would remain open for one hour and it would take 
a 2/3 majority vote to pass. Moderator declared the polls open at 8:55 p.m. with 
Florence Freese, Nancy Pethic, Dolores Francis, Frances Marston, Clerk and Moderator 
serving as ballot officials. Polls were closed at 9:55 p.m. with the following results: 

340 ballots cast - 291 yes and 49 no 

Motion voted affirmative. 



- 61 - 



Pittsfield School District Meeting 
March 22, 1984 
Page 3 



Article II. 



"I move that the reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees and Officers of the 
District be accepted as printed in the Annual Report." Robert Winchester made the 
motion seconded by Ed Young. Voice vote affirmative. 

Article III . 

"I move that the salaries of the School District Officers be approved as follows: 

Moderator $30.00; Clerk $30.00; Chairman of the School Board $400.00; School Board 
Members $300.00 each; Treasurer $400.00; and Truant Officer $100.00." John Genest 
made the motion seconded by Thomas Marston. Voice vote affirmative. 

Article IV. 

"I move that the District vote to raise and appropriate $43,795 to fund all cost items 
relating to teachers' salaries and fringe benefits for the 1984-85 school year, resulting 
from good faith negotiations with teachers and which represent the negotiated increase 
over 1983-84 salaries and fringe benefits." Robert Winchester made the motion seconded 
by Ed Young. 

Steve Adams asked what was the percent of raise and were all teachers receiving 
the same increase? 

Robert Winchester said it was about a 6.7% increase in the total salary account. 
Several factors enter into the individual increase, such as education, years of experience 
and years of service. Voice vote affirmative. 

Article V . 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of fifty-five thousand 
dollars ($55,000.00) for the purpose of effecting repairs to the gymnasium roof and 
furnaces, including related heating system components at the Pittsfield High School. 
(Submitted by Petition) Chester Francis moved that this article be indefinitely 
postponed and Robert Winchester seconded. Voice vote affirmative. 

Article VI . 

"I move that the District vote to raise and appropriate a total operating budget of 
$2,165,689 . for the support of schools, for the salaries of school district officers, 
employees and agents, and for the payment of statutory obligations of the District." 
Chester Francis made the motion seconded by Robert Winchester. 

Mr. Francis spoke on behalf of the Budget Committee and divided the budget into eight 
categories and gave the percentage of increase or decrease for each section 



- 62 - 



Pittsfield School District Meeting 
March 22, 1984 
Page 4 



Discussion continued with much concern about the new tax rate as a result of 
this proposed figure. 

Chester Francis said the bond issue would not effect the tax rate this year, but 
the total increase with both Town and School budgets would be approximately $5 to $6. 

Wayne Emerson said he wanted the records to indicate that $1,790,689. is the 
Budget Committee's recommended figure for the 1984-85 school operating expenses. The 
figure of $2,165,689. is the total budget figure including the bond issue of $375,000. 

According to the figures the salary account was up 12% and this raised questions, 
since we had just voted under Article IV a 6.72 increase in salaries. 

Wayne Emerson agreed that there is a 122 increase in the salary account, however, 
all current teachers and staff members are getting an average of 6*s to 6.72 as previously 
stated. The remaining 42 is for 5 new positions which include 2 full time custodians, 

1 music teacher expanded from part time to full time for the elementary school only, 

2 new positions for Special Education, including a $4,000. speech aid to help deal with 
the increase of 75 students last year to over 95 students in our system this year, and 
an additional $4,000. to help out the vocational aides for those students going to 

the Vocational Center in Concord. This is an additional $41,500. in salaries for 
the 5 new positions. 

Roland Charron wanted to know what has happened to the quality of education in 
Pittsfield when 100 of our students are in Special Education. 402 of what we spend for 
regular education is spent on Special Ed. 

Supt. Paquette answered (1) the School Board and the Administration do not 
determine who moves in and out of Pittsfield; (2) No teacher or administrator in our 
system has the right to designate a child to Special Ed; (3) There is a very precise 
and complicated system regulated by Federal and State Governments to determine if a 
child needs special help. The parents must participate in the process and if we fail 
to do the job we are required to do under the law, the parents can appeal the decision 
to the courts and it will end up costing us much more. 

He further stated he is constantly checking on the progress of these students and 
the special education programs. He requires each district to report every year on the 
educational status of each student in Special Ed, what progress they have made, and why 
they are still coded. 

Supt. Paquette further stressed that because of the strict Federal and State rules 
and regulations governing Special Education children, the School Districts are left 
with very little control, if any. 

Fred Hast asked why the School Board and the Selectmen couldn't work together to 
cut costs of both budgets. He suggested that the Town do the snow removal at the 
school to save money. Also, suggested that the Town and the School use the same tractor 
to mow lawns. The Town is purchasing a new tractor this year so why does the School 
also have to have a new one? 



- 63 - 



Pittsfield School District Meeting 
March 22, 1984 
Page 5 



Thomas Marston said the tractor for the School would be purchased from the 
Drake Field Fund and the only cost would be the maintenance. He felt it would be 
difficult to share a tractor with the Town because of scheduling since the School 
alone uses a tractor about 30 hours a week mowing lawns in the summer. He further 
stated that the School Board would try and talk with the Selectmen about the snow 
removal. Voice vote affirmative. 

Article VII . 

"I move that the District authorize the School Board to make application for and 
receive in the name of the District such funds as may be available from any source, 
and authorize the School Board to expend such funds in accord with the provisions of 
RSA 198"20-b (Supp.)" John Genest made the motion seconded by Robert Winchester. 
Voice vote affirmative. 

Article VIII . 

To see if the District will vote to require the Superintendent of the School 
District to provide and furnish written minutes of all public meetings and hearings 
associated with School District functions, and to require the Superintendent to retain 
and maintain for public view all minutes for such public meetings and hearings for a 
period of not less than ten (10) years from the date(s) of such public meetings or 
hearings. (Submitted by Petition) 

Moderator stated in his opinion this article is covered by a State law, therefore, 
there is no reason to act upon it. Article passed over. 

Article IX. 



To see if the District will vote to require the District Moderator to recognize 
the Chairman, Pittsfield Budget Committee, or his designee, prior to recognition of 
any other persons, for the purpose of presenting Budget Committee recommendations 
relative to appropriations of money for payment of District expenses. (Submitted by 
Petition) No motion received - article passed over. 

Article X. 



"I move that the District vote to create a cooperative school district planning 
committee in accord with the provisions of RSA 195:18 consisting of three qualified 
voters; said members to be appointed by the moderator within ten days of the vote of 
the District." Ed Young made the motion seconded by John Barto. 

Ed Young informed those present that Barnstead had already voted this article 
unanimously. This will enable us to meet with them and explore other alternatives, 
such as Area High School, Cooperative School District, etc. This article allows only 
for a study to be made. The committee appointed will make a report and give their 
recommendations and suggestions at a future public meeting. Voice vote affirmative. 



- 64 - 



Pittsfield School District Meeting 
March 22, 1984 
Page 6 



Article XI. 



To transact any other business which may legally come before this meeting. 

Chester Francis asked if the Moderator would take an unofficial vote on the term 
of the Bond issue. The School Board and the Budget Committee would like to get an idea 
of how the taxpayers feel before they make the final decision. Moderator took an 
unofficial voice vote for a 1,5,10, or 15 year term for the bond issue and the 5 year 
term was definitely favored. 

Thomas Marston said at the Town Meeting and at this School Meeting several have 
indicated a concern over the lack of cooperation between the School Board, Selectmen 
and the town. He stated on behalf of the School Board members, they would definitely 
try and work closely with the Selectmen in the future and hopefully save the taxpayers 
some money. He commended the Budget Committee for their cooperation and help. He 
further stressed the importance of having the full cooperation and help of the towns- 
people in both Town and School affairs. 

Frances Marston made a motion we adjourn. Motion duly seconded and voted 
affirmative at 11:05 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Roberta J. Maxfield, School Clerk 

.n\wv x , 







- 65 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Planning Committee 

At the March 1984 School Meeting, the District voted to have 
the Moderator appoint a three person Cooperative School District 
Planning Committee. They were as follows: 

Robert Moulton, Chairman 

David Adams, Vice-Chairman 

Ed Young, Board Representative 

We regret that Robert Moulton will no longer be with the Com- 
mittee. David Adams has now taken over the role of Chairman, and 
Donald Jenks has joined the Committee. 

The Committee has been involved in several projects over the 
past year: 

A. Information about Pittsfield 

1. Pittsfield Master Plan 

2. Population 

3. Area-Size 

4. Tax Base 

B. Information about New Hampshire Schools 

1. Area High Schools with Sending Districts. 

2. Cooperative School Districts. 

3. Independent School Districts with Contracts. 

4. Standards of the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. 

5. The most recent report on Pittsfield High School 
by the N.E.A.S.C. 

C. Survey 

A questionnaire was put together from Committee input 
and parts of other surveys and questionnaires. The 
questionnaire will be used to find out how the Community 
feels about the Pittsfield Schools, and education in general 

D > Meetings with other Towns 

There have been meetings during the year with Barnstead 
and Barrington. 

E. Possible Alternatives 

1. A COOPERATIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL: GRADES 7-12 

Such an arrangement could be made with any interested 
district. Should it include Barnstead, it would ad- 
dress that town's concerns toward a limited curriculum 
for Junior High School Students in Industrial Arts, Home 
Economics, etc. One important consideration is the fact 
that any cooperative arrangement would allow for the 
sharing of school costs over a larger tax base. With a 
7-12 school, duplication in areas such as Home Econo- 
mics, Industrial Arts, Art, Physical Education, Cafe- 
teria Services, and Library Services can be avoided. 



- 66 - 



2. A COOPERATIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL: GRADES 9-12 

This would maintain the traditional arrangement that is 
in existence now with a sending school but could include 
other districts. It would provide a larger tax base to 
support the program. 

3. A COOPERATIVE DISTRICT: GRADES 1-12 

This plan suggests an arrangement with Barnstead that 
deals with the school placement of all pupils, grades 
1-12. Basically, it would call for the housing of all 
pupils in grades 1-6 at the Barnstead Elementary School, 
and all pupils in grades 7-12 at the Pittsfield High 
School. The suggestion would require increased trans- 
portation costs, and perhaps some additional instructional 
space but would address Barnstead 1 s Junior High Curriculum 
problems, and its High School placement concerns. It 
would allow Pittsfield to discontinue the use of two 
buildings, and would remove young pupils from the high 
school atmosphere. 

4. A MULTIPLE YEAR OR AREA HIGH SCHOOL CONTRACT 

Such an arrangement would undoubtedly require additional 
building space, equipment and staffing. The Committee 
suggests that such an arrangement be tied to a tuition 
adjustment or a contractural building fund agreement. It 
would not meet the objectives of a sending district should 
an expected goal be to participate in decision-making. 



5. SINGLE DISTRICT SCHOOL 

This option would require Pittsfield to bear the total 
responsibility for the financial support of all of its 
schools. We think the tax rate would be affected and 
that a limited financial tax base support would restrict 
academic offerings, a factor that concerns the Committee. 

6. TUITION HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO ANOTHER DISTRICT 

Such a solution is short range, but it would provide an 
answer to our elementary school crowding problem. There 
can be advantages as concerns curriculum offerings, but 
there are also limitations. There is no control on costs, 
there are no decision-making opportunities and student 
participation in extracurricular activities is limited. 

Respectfully submitted, 
David Adams, Chairman 



- 67 - 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Board and citizens of the Pittsfield School District, I 
respectfully submit my 1984 report as your Superintendent of Schools. 

1. Pride in Pittsfield' s Schools 

There is every reason for the citizens of Pittsfield to be proud of 
their schools. Great strides have been made since my last report. 
The voters passed a bond issue and the renovations of the high school 
are virtually complete; only a few minor internal jobs need to be 
completed and the work on the playing field adjacent to the high 
school must await clear dry weather. The accreditation and approval 
status of the school have been assured for the immediate future. The 
students and faculty have taken great pride in the facilities and have 
made a significant contribution to maintaining their cleanliness. 
The custodial staff has continued the monumental effort which they 
began last summer to maintain and improve the facilities by incor- 
porating into their daily work improvements in various parts of the 
facilities . 

2. Accreditation and Approval Status 

As I have indicated above, we have assured the accreditation and 
approval status of the school for the immediate future; however, we 
must now begin to address the implications of the new High School 
Standards approved by the State Board of Education in 1984. These 
new standards must be implemented, in full, for the 1985 entering 
freshmen class; that is, when next year's freshmen graduate they must 
have met all of the new standards adopted by the State Board of 
Education. 

The School Board and the voters of the District must be assured that 
neither accreditation nor approval are jeopardized in the future. 
Accordingly, the Administrators and the professional staff will advise 
the Board and the voters on all the steps which are necessary to assure 
continued accreditation and approval. For the present, we are trying 
to maintain the facility at the highest possible level and we are be- 
ginning to address curriculum and instructional materials questions 
which need our attention during the next few years. 

3. Reorganization; Administrative/Instructional Leadership 

Over the past four years I have watched three different elementary 
school principals struggle with the dif f iculities of providing leadership 
for grades located in three different buildings. In addition, I have 
watched the high school principal and elementary principal try to address, 
constantly, the use of facilities at the high school when two different 
principals had classes located within the same building. Further, I have 
watched the difficulties encountered by a reading coordinator working in 
grades one through six — in three different buildings. At the same time, 
I have watched attempts to improve reading in grades 7 and 8 even though 
those grades were not under the direction of the reading coordinator. 
Also, like many others, I have been concerned about having fifth and 
sixth graders located in the same building with high school students; this 
is simply not a good situation. 

The issues which I have just outlined raised in my mind the question of 
how the administrative and instructional leadership of the Pittsfield 
Schools could be reorganized so as to provide more consistent leadership, 
more administrative and instructional time on task, and a clearer identity 
for students in the middle grades (5-8) . I reviewed the issues which I 
have outlined with the local administrators and the professional staff, 

- 68 - 



I discussed these issues with many people in the District and with the 
Pittsfield School Board. Having done so, I recommended to the School 
Board that, during the 1984-85 school year, we attempt a reorganization 
of the administrative and instructional leadership in grades 1-8. 
Specifically, I recommended that the elementary school principal position 
and the reading coordinator position be reorganized into an Elementary 
Principal/Reading Coordinator, Grades 1-4 and an Assistant Principal/ 
Reading Coordinator Grades 5-8 . At the same time I recommended that the 
High School Principal become the Principal for the Middle-High School 
with the new Assistant Principal/Reading Coordinator and the High School 
Assistant Principal serving directly under the Middle-High School Principal, 

As a result of this reorganization, which the Board approved, we have 
been able to reduce the cost of administration by $5,000 and devote that 
$5,000 to the improvement of reading (see Superintendent's Reading Initia- 
tive, below). The Elementary Principal/Reading Coordinator is now able 
to concentrate all of his efforts in the grammar and memorial schools, 
downtown. The Assistant Principal/Reading Coordinator for Grades 5-8 
is able to concentrate all of his efforts in those grades in one building. 
In addition to the reorganization of personnel, grades 5-8 have been 
physically grouped for the majority of their instruction within the 
high school building so that they are clearly identifiable as a middle 
school unit capable of being supervised by the Principal and Assistant 
Principal/Reading Coordinator in a more efficient way. Also, all of the 
grades now housed within the middle-high school are now under the super- 
vision of a single principal rather than two. 

I believe that the effect of this reorganization of personnel, space, 
and students will be noticable by the end of the present academic year; 
we will see improved administrative efficiency and improved instructional 
leadership as a result of this reorganization. 

4. Superintendent's Reading Initiative 

The Superintendent's Reading Initiative is a result of my conviction 
about the importance of a student's ability to read. This ability is 
the foundation of all learning, in my judgement. This philosophy has been 
reflected in all of my work since I first became Superintendent of the 
Pittsfield Schools. Thus, it is out of this conviction that I requested 
that the professional staff identify all elementary and middle school 
students who are reading significantly below grade level. The purpose of 
my initiative was to insure that these students were receiving appropriate 
instruction, including supplementary services. "Every effort," I advised 
my colleagues, "must be made to assist these students to achieve their 
potential. Every effort must be made to have every student reading on 
grade level who is capable of doing so." 

In Pittsfield, 66 students in grades 1-8 (18%) were identified as reading 
significantly below grade level. The students in grades 1-4 are receiving 
Chapter 1, Special Education and Speech and Language Services. The Prin- 
cipal/Reading Coordinator provides diagnostic services and instructional 
guidance. In grades 5-8, 9 children were identified as needing instruc- 
tional support beyond that offered through Special Education and Chapter 1. 

Based upon my analysis and recommendation, the Pittsfield Board agreed 
that the needs of these students would be met most effectively through 
direct instruction from a part-time reading tutor. Accordingly, I 
requested that the Board permit the use of those funds saved from the 
reorganization of the administration/reading personnel to provide tutorial 
support to these students who needed additional instruction. Mrs. 
Catherine Hamblett, Chapter 1 Coordinator, supervises the tutor and 
provides instructional guidance and diagnostic services for grades 5-8 
in cooperation with the Assistant Principal/Reading Coordinator who super- 
vises all instruction in grades 5-8. The work of these people and the 

- 69 - 



achievement of the students will be fully evaluated this spring. Already, 
however, I have had informal reports from parents and teachers, that the 
program is making a significant difference for these students. 

It is my hope — indeed, my expectation — that through early intensive 
work on improving students' reading skills, we can improve the rate of 
success of our students, reduce the retention rate, and reduce the number 
of students who have been identified for special education purposes as 
being learning disabled. Only time and constant evaluation will deter- 
mine whether or not this initiative in reading delivers the desired 
dividends. 

5. Special Education 

The cost of Special Education continues to increase at a rate greater 
than the rate increase for the total budget for the School District. 
This development is as difficult for the administration and the School 
Board to accept as it is for the taxpayers. We are constantly re- 
evaluating how students are referred for Special Education, how many 
students are involved in the programs and what services are required 
under State and Federal law. You will note, in the Report of the Edu- 
cation Fifty-One Consortium which is included in this Annual Report, 
that a significant amount of money has been saved in Special Education 
costs over the past three years by having the Pittsfield School District 
cooperate with Alton and Barnstead in providing for some special educa- 
tion services. Nevertheless, the costs continue to mount. 

I believe that there is only one way to offset this increasing cost for 
these mandated programs; we must have greater financial assistance from 
the State and the Federal government to support these programs which 
laws from those levels of government impose upon the local School District, 
If these levels of government insist that the local districts provide 
these services, then they must provide the financial assistance for 
carrying out these mandates. Please do not misunderstand my position in 
this regard; I believe that, ultimately, proper special education for 
handicapped students will result in more productive citizens; however, 
I also recognize that we must find ways to lessen the tax burden at the 
local level. 

The taxpayers of the District should know that the Pittsfield School 
Board has met with its delegation to the New Hampshire State Legislature 
to discuss the matter of revenues to the Pittsfield School District. The 
three legislators (out of four) who attended a meeting with the School 
Board all indicated that they supported a new formula for state aid to 
education which would bring substantially more revenues to the Pittsfield 
School District. In addition, the School Board members have written 
letters to their legislators to request their continued specific support 
for this new formula, which would take effect during the 1985-86 budget 
year. I also have written to the legislators in support of the new state 
aid formula and I am also writing to our congressional delegation to seek 
a change in the federal law which prevents us from using some funds to 
support mandated programs . 

I encourage taxpayers of the District to speak to their Representatives 
and Senator _to ask that they support the proposed change in the formula 
for state aid to education. 

6. Cooperative School District Study 

Last year, I asked that the voters of the District support a warrant 
article requesting the appointment of a Cooperative School District 
Planning Committee; the voters did support that warrant article and 
the Committee has been appointed. This year's Annual Report includes 



- 70 - 



a report from the Committee which outlines the various options that 
the Committee is considering. The Barnstead School District also voted 
in favor of a Cooperative School District Study Committee and their 
Committee has been at work as well. These two Committees are addressing 
the long-term issues which must be faced by the communities of Barnstead 
and Pittsfield. But it appears that the rapidly increasing costs for 
both Districts and the unpredictability of tuition rates at schools 
of attendance of Barnstead students have created a crisis for both 
Districts. Whether or not a solution can be achieved for the two 
Districts on a long-term basis depends upon the results of the work of 
the two Cooperative School District Committees. In the interim, 
however, I must raise the issue as to whether or not the Barnstead 
and Pittsfield School Boards should get together to consider their 
mutual concerns and problems on a short-term basis. Both Districts 
are facing a serious financial situation in their educational budgets; 
somehow, more stability must be brought to the annual budget process 
so that current requirements can be met and so that the new State 
Standards for High Schools can be implemented in a cost efficient way. 

I ask the voters of the Pittsfield School District to reread Section 4 
of my report of last year. I also urge them to consider carefully the 
alternatives being studied by the Pittsfield Cooperative School District 
Study Committee. In addition, I ask the voters to be as supportive as 
possible to the Cooperative School District Committee when it conducts 
its surveys and undertakes other public means for trying to determine 
how the District should plan for the future. 

I believe that there are solutions available to the Pittsfield School District 
and I believe that it is possible for Pittsfield to work with Barnstead in a 
cooperative and constructive manner. These two communities have a long history 
of family relationships and combined efforts. Now is the time to build on 
that past and to do so constructively, in the interest of the children of both 
Districts. I ask the voters of Pittsfield to consider, as objectively as 
possible, all of the options which will assure quality education at a reasonable 
cost for the children of Pittsfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 



F. Andre' Paquette, 
Superintendent of Schools 



- 71 - 



REPORT OF THE MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

To the members of the Pittsfield School Board, the Superintendent of 
Schools, and the citizens of Pittsfield, I respectfully submit my seventh 
annual report. This is my first annual report as Principal of Pittsfield 
Middle-High School. 

The academic year began on September 5 with 455 students enrolled in 
grades five through twelve. There are 193 students in grades five through 
eight (down from 209 last year) and 262 students in grades nine through twelve 
(down from 300 last year). We enrolled 359 students from Pittsfield, 91 from 
Barnstead, 3 from Epsom and 2 from Chichester. Twelve people have joined our 
professional staff. They are Ms. Linda Bandecchi, Grade 5; Ms. Catherine 
Bennett, English; Mr. John Calvin, Science; Ms. Louise Graham, Special Educa- 
tion; Ms. Ellen Gorr , Special Education; Ms. Debra Hall, Grade 6; Ms. Diane 
Johnson, Art Grades 1-8; Ms. Beverly Rouble, English; Mr. Louis Lafasciano, 
Assistant Principal/Reading Coordinator, Grades 5-8; Ms. Roberta Price-Herzig, 
English; Ms. Hope Perkins, Grade 6; Mr. Hans von Brockdorff, Library Media 
Specialist. 

Fifty-six students began courses in September in the Area 11 Vocational 
Center at Concord High School. Seven students are enrolled in Auto Mechanics, 
two in Building Construction, four in Child Care, three in Distributive 
Education, eight in Food Services, seven in Health Occupations, eight in 
Machine Trades, and eight in Welding. Students spend two periods a day at the 
Vocational Center and take the rest of their classes at Pittsfield. The staff 
at the Vocational Center continues to be cooperative and supportive. 

The highlight of the year past is the passage of the bond and the subse- 
quent repairs and renovations to our building. All of the major deficiencies 
in our facility have been corrected and as a result we remain fully accredited 
by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 

Pittsfield High School has been designated as a comprehensive approved 
high school for the first time in five years by the New Hampshire Department 
of Education. The upgrading of our approval status is a direct result of the 
improvements made in our facility. 

Our seventh and eighth grade program has also been upgraded to the status 
of an approved junior high school. The Department of Education commended the 
Pittsfield School District for addressing the problems of safety and facility 
requirements. I am very pleased with the improved status of our high school 
and junior high programs as this has been one of our major goals during the 
past few years. 

The majority of our students are achieving higher than average scores on 
the nationally-normed Metropolitan Achievement Tests. Although we cannot rest 
until all of our students are achieving at or above their grade level, we can, 
nevertheless, be proud of our students' achievement. 

The New Standards for High Schools issued by the State Board of Education 
will be implemented beginning in September 1985. The administration is now 
analyzing the new standards to determine their financial and educational impact. 

For the first time, Pittsfield High School qualified for a Blue Ribbon 
Achievement Award from the State Department of Education and the New Hampshire 
School Volunteer Program. Part of the reason for this award was the hard work 
and long hours put in by Ms. Brenda Abbott in bringing in over fifty volunteers 
for a very successful Career Day in February. 



- 72 - 



I wish to thank all of our staff for their continued work and 
dedication to the students of Pittsfield Middle-High School. I am grateful 
for the support of the Pittsfield School Board; Superintendent of Schools, 
F. Andre 1 Paquette; Business Administrator, Wayne Emerson; the students, 
staff and the People of Pittsfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Stephen M. Fortado 



- 73 - 



REPORT OF THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL/ 
READING COORDINATOR 

To the members of the Pittsfield School Board, the Superintendent of 
Schools, and the citizens of Pittsfield, I respectfully submit my first 
annual report as Principal /Reading Coordinator of Pittsfield Elementary 
School. 

The academic year began on September 5, with 185 students enrolled in 
grades one through four. This is a ten percent increase over last year and 
is the fourth year in a row that enrollment has shown an increase. Nine 
new staff members have joined Pittsf eld Elementary School. They are 
Mrs. Claire Dors, Music 1-6; Ms. Marianne Eagleston, Resource Room, 1-4 
Mrs. Michele Freitag, Speech and Language Therapist; Ms. Alice Hickey, 
Grade 1; Ms. Diane Johnson, Art, 1-8; Mrs. Mary Serwecinski-McCormack, 
Grade 3; Mrs. Linda Nazer , Special Education Aide; and Mr. David Clark, 
Elementary School Custodian. 

Pittsfield Elementary School continues to be designated as a Category 
II approved elementary school by the New Hampshire State Department of 
Education. The hiring of a full time music teacher has strengthened this 
standing, but minimum standards still not met are: no Physical Education 
program nor teacher, no guidance services, and an inadequate collection of 
library books. 

An enthusiastic staff this year has set two-year instructional goals and 
objectives to improve the present curriculum and instructional program. 
Among these goals are: 1) developing in the student an ability to integrate 
Language Arts skills in written self-expression, 2) taking students syste- 
matically through all Mathematical skills appropriate for students' instruc- 
tional levels, and 3) developing an understanding of the basic approach in 
Social Studies and Science. Another major project for this year is to build 
a library at the Memorial School, which is accessible to students on a daily 
basis. The establishment of a student council, under the guidance of Mrs. 
Mary- Ellen Azem, has given the children a sense of direct participation in 
their education. 

For the third year in a row, Pittsfield Elementary School qualified for 
the Annual Blue Ribbon Achievement Award presented by the New Hampshire 
Department of Education for our standing School Volunteer Program. Mrs. 
Brenda Abbott and Mrs. Sheila Fries, our local coordinators have unselfishly 
developed a highly successful and important contribution to our school. 

Mrs. Louise Carr and Mrs. Ruth Casey, along with other members of the 
Parent-Teacher Organization, have devoted many hours to the efforts of 
the organization. A theme, "Children's Mental and Physical Health," has 
been adopted for this year. Monthly, speakers have addressed topics related 
to this theme. Several P.T.O. fundraisers have allowed the children to 
participate in educational field trips. 

The reorganization of the school into a smaller unit has given the staff 
and the students, for the first time, a chance to form a cohesive and spiri- 
ted school. The emphasis of our instruction lies primarily on the basic 
subjects of Reading, Language and Math. Combining the role of reading coor- 
dinator with that of the principal has created an opportunity for a continu- 
ation of the existing comprehensive program and a chance for added emphasis 
on developing an even more effective program. If we could keep our present 
staff of committed teachers, this latter aim could be more assuredly met. 



- 74 - 



I wish to thank all members of the school community who help with our 
program. I am also grateful for the support of the Pittsfield School Board, 
Superintendent of Schools, Mr. F. Andre' Paquette and the fine faculty of 
teachers and support staff. The genuine desire of the children of Pittsfield 
for a quality education is, however, the driving force of this school system. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Harry Doten 
Principal/Reading Coordinator 



- 75 - 



REPORT ON SPECIAL EDUCATION 

To the members of the Pittsfield School Board, the Superintendent of 
Schools and citizens of Pittsfield, I respectfully submit my first annual 
report. 

The Special Education Program in Pittsfield has continued to provide, 
in accordance with State and Federal Laws, a free and appropriate education 
for all students aged 3-21 who have been identified as educationally handi- 
capped. Through the utilization of available resources and the skill of a 
committed staff, programs have been designed and implemented to meet the 
often unique and individual needs of these students. 

The Special Education staff was asked to review the educational needs 
of 44 students during the 1983-84 school year. These students were referred 
by their parents, teachers, administrators and other agencies. Thirty-two of 
these students were found to be educationally handicapped, bringing the total 
number of special needs students to 91 by June of 1984. This figure represents 
approximately 13% of the entire school population which is comparable to the 
average range for national statistics. 

Seventy-six of these students are placed in existing in-district programs 
including the resource rooms, speech and language therapy and occupational 
therapy. The remaining 15 students are enrolled in out-of-district programs 
due to the severity of their handicaps, with 8 students in Education Fifty-One 
Consortium programs and 7 in other out-of-district placements. 

As it is impossible to determine the number of students who will be 
referred for special services, the cost of providing programming for students 
who were identified as educationally handicapped during the school year 
(requiring out-of-district placement) added a significant unanticipated expen- 
diture to the Special Education budget. 

The rising costs of providing services for educationally handicapped 
students, coupled with the decrease in State and Federal aid, continues to 
place an increasing burden on small school districts, such as Pittsfield, 
which operate on a relatively limited tax base. The Special Education 
Program has made every effort to maintain quality in-district programs 
which alleviate the need to utilize more costly out-of-district alternatives. 
In addition, cooperative efforts with neighboring school districts, which 
resulted in the formation of the Education Fifty-One Consortium, continue to 
provide substantial savings to the Taxpayers of Pittsfield. 

The current special education services available to students include a 
continuous Resource Room and Speech/Language Program for students in grades 
one through twelve. An instructional aide provides support to students main- 
streamed into the regular classroom. Occupational Therapy, evaluation services 
and counseling are also available on a limited basis, as needed. 

Due to the success and quality of these programs, 80% of the eighty- 
seven students identified as educationally handicapped are placed in-district. 
Of the remaining seventeen students, thirteen participate in Education Fifty- 
One Programs while four are placed in other out-of-district programs. 



- 76 - 



The skills necessary to provide services to these students should be 
underscored. Pittsfield has been fortunate to have a special education staff 
that not only demonstrates professional competence, but also the commitment 
and dedication that such positions require. It is only through the efforts 
of the staff and the continued support of the administration, parents and 
the community that we can continue to provide quality, cost-effective programs 
for the educationally handicapped students of Pittsfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Mary-Ellen Azem 

Special Education Consultant 



- 77 - 



EDUCATION FIFTY-ONE CONSORTIUM 
ANNUAL REPORT 



To the members of the Pittsfield School Board, the Superintendent of 
Schools, and the citizens of Pittsfield, I respectfully submit my annual 
report. 

Since the passage of Public Law 94-142, the Handicapped Education Law, 
(by the U.S. Congress), which mandates that local school districts must 
provide a free and appropriate public education, which includes special 
education and related services, to all handicapped students ages 3-21, the 
three school districts in SAU #51 have made a concerted effort to respond 
to the many challenges presented by this law. 

However, changes in the state funding formula for special education, 
which continues to place the increasing burden of special education costs 
on the local school districts, coupled with the total unpredictability in 
the numbers of handicapped students who choose to reside within the districts 
at any given time, have continued to presert ? complex problem for the local 
school districts. 

The Education Fifty-One Consortium was formed four years ago in response 
to these problems. It provides an opportunity for the three school districts 
in SAU #51 to develop cost effective cooperative programs within SAU #51 
instead of sending students to more expensive, out-of -district programs which 
are very expensive in tuition and transportation costs. 

To insure that the programs and services offered through Education 
Fifty-One continue to meet the needs of handicapped students in SAU #51 in 
a successful and cost effective manner, the following five principles (set 
forth by the Superintendent of Schools) are strictly adhered to in the deve- 
lopment and operation of all programs: 

1. Programs must be based on annual zero-based planning; that is, 
each year, all individual student's needs, programs and services 
are reevaluated to determine what program needs can best be met 
through cooperative efforts, 

2. Programs and services recommended should be equal to (or better 
than) those currently provided, 

3. The cost of programs and services recommended should be the same 
as (or less than) the cost of budgeted ones, 

4. The programs and services recommended cannot jeopardize the 
receipt of State or Federal Funds, 

5. Any staff employed cannot become a long term commitment for 
any district. 

During the 1983-84 school year, several cooperative programs have been 
provided in this way. 

BEHAVIOR ADJUSTMENT CLASS (B.A.C.) : 

The B.A.C. Program, which is housed in the old Building Trades 
building in Pittsfield, served 15 junior and senior high aged students 
who required a structured, self-contained program in order to achieve 
school success. 



- 78 - 



Through intensive individual instruction, counseling sessions and the 
application of a strong behavior management system, the program helps students 
develop positive self-images while building the appropriate social, academic 
and behavioral skills necessary for success at school, at home and in the 
community. The program's goal of returning students to regular programs as 
soon as possible is being realized as many students are now being main- 
streamed in regular high school classes and the Regional Vocational Center 
in Concord, N.H. 

LANGUAGE IMPAIRED PROGRAM (L . I . P . ) : 

The L.I. P. Program which was housed in the Pittsfield Grammar School 
served 13 students who required a self-contained special education program 
with a strong emphasis on the development and improvement of language skills, 
basic academic ability and skills for daily living. 

However, due to the ages of the student population and changes in their 
social and academic needs, the L.I. P. Program as designed and implemented over 
the past three years would no longer be appropriate for the majority of 
students in 1984-85. Therefore, the program has been redesigned, restaffed 
and relocated in the Alton Middle School for the 1984-85 school year. While 
language development and remediation are still important components of the 
program preparation for formal vocational training, basic academic survival 
skills, and independent living skills are now the primary focus. 

EVALUATION AND THERAPY ; 

Continued cooperation between the districts has allowed each district to 
have access to a school Psychologist and Occupational Therapist. By sharing 
staff, the cost for each district to contract separately for these services is 
greatly reduced. In addition, the districts of Pittsfield and Barnstead have 
been able to contract the services of a Special Education Consultant and 
Speech and Language Therapist. 

Programming for pre-school educationally handicapped students (as re- 
quired by law) became a planning priority during the 1983-84 school year. 
SAU #51 received a competitive grant to hire a consultant who investigated 
the need for a pre-school program and, along with representatives of each 
district, designed a pre-school special education program which is cost 
effective for the three districts. This program currently serves 8 students 
in SAU #51 and is housed in the Alton Community Church in Alton, N.H. 

Education Fifty-One Consortium programs have been, and continue to be, 
very successful. They have developed a reputation for excellence and cost- 
effectiveness and they are visited and studied frequently by other school 
districts and SAU's which are in the process of developing similar programs. 

Since its formation, the Education Fifty-One Consortium has saved the 
Pittsfield School District a total of $235,289, it saved Pittsfield 
$99,846 in 1983-84, alone; it has saved the other districts of SAU #51 a 
total of $71,761 in 1983-84 and all three districts a total of $500,166 
over the past three years. (These savings are summarized in the three 
tables below.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mark D. Jarvis , 
Program Supervisor 



- 79 - 



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- 82 - 



REPORT OF CHAPTER 1 



1984 was an exciting year. Chapter 1 activities from our SAU #51 
Cooperative Project were selected for publication in the Tri-State 
Chapter _1 Sourcebook . The Tri-State Project was a cooperative project 
of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont Chapter 1 Programs. Task forces from 
the three states sought examples of instructional activities which re- 
flected findings in recent research on effective schools. The project 
and Sourcebook were selected for funding under former U. S. Secretary 
Bell's Chapter 1 initiative. The four activities selected from our local 
project reflect the work of all Chapter 1 Tutors in Alton, Barnstead 
and Pittsfield. 

Chapter 1 is a federally funded program for compensatory education. 
Programs funded under Chapter 1 are developed locally to successfully 
meet the supplementary instructional needs of educationally disadvantaged 
children. Our local project provided supplementary tutoring in reading, 
listening, writing (composition, spelling and punctuation), speaking 
(expression), and study skills. 

During 1983-84, 40 children participated in Pittsfield Chapter 1. 
Of these children in grades 1-8, 33 remained in the program a full year. 
The progress of Chapter 1 children is measured formally through standard- 
ized tests, and informally through classroom teacher and tutor judgement, 
writing samples, oral reading samples, and comparisons with overall school 
achievement. In Pittsfield, 78% (31) of Chapter 1 children improved in 
reading comprehension, oral reading fluency, writing, study skills, and 
self-concept. 33% (14) of 1983-84 Chapter 1 children are continuing in 
the program this year. 

Trina Blackwood, Sheila Fries, and Carol Grainger are Chapter 1 
Tutors in Pittsfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Catherine M. Hamblett, 
Chapter 1 Coordinator 
Alton, Barnstead, Pittsfield 



- 83 - 



SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES 

Sports Physicals 69 

Screenings: 

-Vision 237 

-Hearing 234 

-Scoliosis 119 

-Height 281 

-Weight 281 

First Aid and Office Visits 2,172 

Communicable Diseases: 

-Chicken Pox 5 

-Pediculosis 11 

-Fifth Disease 1 

-Scarlet Fever 2 

Referrals: 

-Vision 36 

-Hearing 25 

-Posture 9 

-Dental 30 

-Blood Pressure 5 

-Child & Family Services 9 

Miscellaneous: 

-Preschool Screenings & Registrations 39 

-PSVS & PSHS 52 

-Immunizations 11 

-Medical Monitoring 10 

Equipment and procedures within the Pittsfield School Dis- 
trict Health Services are in the process of being updated. Sco- 
liosis Screening in grades 5-8 is being implemented this year as 
mandated by the State of New Hampshire. The immunization status 
of students in the Pittsfield School District is nearly at the 
states required level. 

Many students are becoming interested and involved in health 
and health care. 

Unfortunately, emergency information on some students is in- 
complete or missing. A local emergency phone number is a vital 
piece of information for each child's file. 

The past two years as school nurse for the Pittsfield School 
District has been an enlightening experience. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Laura N. Welch, R.N. 
School Nurse 



- 84 - 



Report of the Staff Development Committee 

To the members of the Pittsfield School Board, the Superintendent of 
Schools and the citizens of Pittsfield, I respectfully submit my second 
Annual Report as Chairperson of the S.A.U. #51 Staff Development Committee. 

This report will include the activities of the Staff Development 
Committee from March, 1984 through March, 1985. 

During this year several local in-service workshops and university 
courses were made available to S.A.U. staff members. Among these were 
"School Law," sponsored by the Alton Community-Home Coordinator, "Main- 
streaming Educationally Handicapped Students into Regular Secondary Class- 
rooms," sponsored by the S.A.U. Special Education Management Team and 
Junior Great Books Training, sponsored by Chapter 1. 

At the beginning of the school year, Staff Development Committee 
members again made themselves available to the staff, especially new 
members, to help develop Professional Growth Plans. Mr. Peter Boyd and 
Mrs. Kathy Mahanes represent the high school and the elementary school, 
respectively. 

In June, Committee members elected officers: 

Chairperson - Harry Doten, Pittsfield Elementary School 
Vice-Chairperson - Linda Nelson, Barnstead Elementary School 
Secretary - Mary Christy, Alton Central School 

During most of this school year, the Committee has planned for a 
major spring in-service day to be conducted at Alton Central School. At 
that time secondary teachers will be offered an all-day seminar which 
deals with interpersonal relationships, team building and time management. 
Middle school faculties will attend a seminar on identifying and clarify- 
ing goals for the development of a middle school. Elementary teachers 
will be provided with equipment and ideas to make learning center games. 

To keep teachers informed of workshops being offered, the Committee 
has continued to distribute workshop listings with relevant information. 
Linda Nelson, Committee member from Barnstead Elementary School, has been 
largely responsible for publishing this information. 

For the fall and winter of 1985-86, the Committee will sponsor 
graduate level courses in education in the S.A.U. //51 area. These courses 
will be offered by Notre Dame College in Manchester. We are presently 
surveying staff members to determine their preferences for courses. 

Mid-year the Committee voted to include representation from the 
Education Fifty-One Consortium. Mr. Edward Allen, teacher of the 
Behavioral Adjustment Class, serves as the first representative from 
that group of educators. 

I would like to express my appreciation for the support of the School 
Board Members, Superintendent F. Andre' Paquette and the staff members of 
the three Districts. I also wish to thank the Committee members for their 
efforts, especially my fellow officers, Linda Nelson and Mary Christy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry Doten 

Staff Development Chairperson 



- 85 - 



REPORT OF THE DRAKE FIELD PROGRAMS 
Drake Field Renovations 



1984 was a year of significant change for the Drake Athletic 
Fields. Renovation of the Drake Field facilities took many forms, 
including the painting and repair of the outside fence, refurbishing 
of the tennis courts, and repairs in the grandstand locker room 
facilities. The biggest changes were the redesigning and reconstruc- 
tion of the playing fields. 

In the fall of 1983 the large mound was removed and the entire 
facility was regraded allowing for drainage, and an ample supply of 
loam to start grass growth was added. A new turf and stone dust 
baseball infield was installed and moved closer to the grandstand. 
A practice Softball field of stone dust was created, and expansion 
through regrading allowed for creation of new soccer and field hockey 
fields in the baseball outfield. Following completion of the grad- 
ing, the entire field was seeded and fertilized. In the fall of 1984 
both the high school field hockey and soccer teams played on the new 
Drake Field facilities. In the fall of 1984 a new basketball court 
was paved. 

There are a few projects left to be completed in the spring of 
1985; they include installation of playground equipment and the 
softball back stop. 

It is hoped the future will allow a maintenance person to be em- 
ployed at Drake to maintain the facilities from April 15th to November 
15th. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jonas Glidden, Drake Field Director 



- 86 - 



DRAKE FIELD RECREATION PROGRAM 

The 1984 Drake Field Recreation Program was directed by 
Peter Boyd and CETA aide Cami Lavoie. Due to renovations at 
Drake Field, the Grammar School facilities were used. Before 
school had ended, a letter of introduction was distributed to 
children in grades one through six. Permission slips were re- 
turned before a child used any equipment. Forms were avail- 
able at the school, and many children registered throughout the 
s umme r . 

After new playground equipment was purchased, the summer 
program began and lasted eight weeks. The hours of the program 
were 8:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. 

There were over one hundred children registered, with 
30-35 coming most days. Because of the locality, quite a num- 
ber of older children used the basketball courts for games. 

The summer activites included: peggyball, ringtoss, kick- 
ball, basketball, scoopball, horseshoes, tennis and badminton. 
Various games such as: Yahtzee, Chess, Pit and Battleships were 
also available. Many of the younger children enjoyed the swings 
and monkeybars. 

Two field trips were arranged this summer. We went to Weirs 
Beach and, later in August, we went to Hampton Beach. 

I would like to thank Cami Lavoie and all the chaperones who 
helped with the field trips. Most of all, thanks to the kids of 
Pittsfield who made my job and summer enjoyable . 



Sincerely, 

Peter Boyd, 
Recreation Director 



- 87 - 



PITTSFIELD ELEMTARY SCHOOL 
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT # 51 



1984-1985 
FACULTY ROSTER 



Salary 


Name 


Position 


$12,126 


Dors, Claire 


Music 1-6 


$11,255 


Eagleston, Marianne 


Resource Room 1-4 


$10,287 


Freitag, Michele 


Speech/Language Therapist 


$10,932 


Hayden, Cheryl 


Grade 4 


$11,029 


Hickey, Alice 


Grade 1 


$10,287 


Johnson, Diane 


Art 1-8 


$15,157 


Landry, Judith 


Grade 3 


$11,674 


Locke, Nancy 


Grade 1 


$12,222 


Mahanes, Kathy S 


Grade 2 


$ 6,602 


Nazer, Linda 


Special Education Aide 


$14,157 


Purtell, Edith I 


Grade 4 


$11,029 


Serwecinski-McCormack, Mary 


Grade 3 


$14,931 


Stapleton, Marjorie E. 


Grade 2 


$15,673 


Wallace, Sylvia J. 


Grade 1 


$14,157 


Welch, Laura N. 


Nurse, 1-12 


$19,322 


Doten, Harry G. 


Principal/Reading Coordin 



PITTSFIELD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



1984-85 



SUPPORT STAFF ROSTER 



Name 



Position 



Clark, David 
Huggins, Kathryn M, 

Miller, Pamela R. 



Custodian, Elementary School 
Part Time Secretary, 

Memorial School 
Administrative Secretary 

Elementary School 



- 88 - 



PITTSFIELD MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL 
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #51 

Salary Name 

$14,835 ALIE, Sherry A. 

$12,642 BANDECCHI, Linda 

$17,511 BECK, James N. 

$11,223 BENNETT, Katherine 

$13,609 BISHOP, Jeanne C. 

$15,641 BOEHM, Kurt I. 

$10,610 BOURGAULT, Shari 

$18,027 BOYD, Peter W. 

$10,288 CALVIN, John 

$17,576 DAVIS, Gerald A. 

$11,481 DEBSKI, Paula A. 

$12,126 DORS, Claire 

$21,400 DOUGLASS, John W. 

$10,932 FINN, Timothy J. 

$14,544 FOGG, Nancy J. 

$15,609 FOREMAN, Corinne A. 

$10,707 FOURNIER, Richard 

$16,125 GLIDDEN, Elaine G. 

$16,060 GLIDDEN, Jonas A. 

$10,288 GORR, Ellen J. 

$14,061 GRAHAM, Louise 

$10,288 HALL, Debra Sue 

$13,674 HAMEL, Stephen 

$18,930 HORNE, Richard K. 

$10,287 JOHNSON, Diane M. 

$11,255 ROUBLE, Beverly 

$11,835 MARLAND, William E. 

$15,318 OSGOOD, Jonine A. 

$16,866 PELLERIN, Alfred Jr. 

$10,288 PERRINS, Hope 

$10,707 PRICF-HERZIG, Roberta 

$15,093 SANBORN, Hugh 

$16,931 TAYLOR, Vernon D. 

$17,189 VONBROCKDORFF , Hans 

$14,157 WELCH, Laura N. 

$31,000 FORT ADO, Stephen 

$22,000 GUNDEL, Michael 

$19,000 LAFASCIANO, Louis 



19*4-85 
FACULTY ROSTER 



Position 

Home Economics 

Grade 5 

Art 

English 

Business Education 

Mathematics 

Science 

Science 

Science 

English 

Music 

Music 

Guidance Director 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

French 

Mathematics 

Business Education 

Social Studies 

Special Education 

Special Education 

Grade 6 

Physical Education 

Mathematics 

Art 

English 

Industrial Arts 

Special Education 

English 

Grade 6 

English 

Industrial Arts 

Grade 5 

Librarian 

Nurse 

Principal 

Assistant Principal 9-12 

Assistant Principal/ 

Reading Coordinator 5-8 



- 89 - 



PITTSFIELD MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL 
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #51 



1984-83 
Support Staff Roster 



Name 

ADAMS, Jane 
BELCASTRO, Bonnie 
BURKE, Judy 
CARPENTER, David 
KEEGAN, Kevin 
LEDUC, Mary 
MARTIN, Ronald 
OMUNDSON, Anne 
RICHARDS, David R. 
RIEL, Marilyn F. 
ROBERTS, Joyce F. 
SANVILLE, Thomas H, 
SHONYO, Holly 
STOCK, Ad or a L. 
SWEET, Elizabeth 



Position 

Baker, Food Services 

Bookkeeper /Receptionist ,High School 

Custodian 

Food Services Director 

Custodian 

Dishwasher, Food Services 

Custodian 

Guidance Secretary 

Director of Maintenance 

Administrative Secretary 

Middle School Secretary 

Custodian 

Utility Worker, Food Services 

Cook's Helper, Food Services 

First Cook, Food Services 



- 90 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

AND SUPPORTING SCHEDULES, 

REPORT ON INTERNAL ACCOUNTING CONTROLS 

AND REPORT ON COMPLIANCE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Prepared by: MASON & RICH PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 

Accountants & Auditors 
Concord, New Hampshire 



- 91 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1984 
INDEX 



Exhibit Page No. 

Auditor's Report 

COMBINED STATEMENTS - GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Groups A 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes 
in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund Types B 

Combined Statement of Revenue, Expenditures and Changes 
in Fund Balances - Budget and Actual - General and C 

Special Revenue Fund Types 

Notes to Financial Statements 

SUPPORTING SCHEDULES 



Schedule 



General Fund: 



Statement of Revenues Compared to Budget 1 

Statement of Expenditures Compared to Budget 2 

Special Revenue Funds: 

Combining Balance Sheet 3 

Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and 
Changes in Fund Balances 4 

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in 
Fund Balance - Food Service Fund 5 

Agency Funds 

Statement of Changes in Assets and Liabilities 6 

REPORT ON INTERNAL ACCOUNTING CONTROLS 

Auditor's Internal Control Letter 

Findings, Recommendations and Managements Comments 

REPORT ON COMPLIANCE 

Compliance Letter 
Findings 



- 92 - 



A/fasoty 

£\_ J P( vfcssion al_ Assoc ui tioi i 



ACCOLJXTAXT.S K AUDITORS 



/.■■ »% \/ /' masos. i:\ 

.It >\ i< : \\ ( /• ■-, 

THOMAS ! lifAKSf/ < /■ \ 



II : I I'HOSI IMKI 22 ■ /if>. 

( AHHKiAIIS < "VMO\s 

24 1 SOUTH M \l\ S/K/ ! ! 

CO.\< OHI) MM HAMI'SHIItl IIXVH 



MH I I- KK II ( I'.A 
,M/< IIAll i> WIS (I' A 

t; j ni r s( mi;' I ( i \ 

l(>ll\ : I VI I tlil 



September 12, 1984 



Members of the School Board 
Pittsfield School District 



We have examined the combined financial statements of the funds and account 
group as indexed, of the Pittsfield School District as of and for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1984. Our examination was made in accordance 
with generally accepted auditing standards and accordingly, included such 
tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as we 
considered necessary in the circumstances. 

As is the general practice with many New Hampshire municipalities, the 
Pittsfield School District has not maintained a record of its general fixed 
assets and accordingly, a statement of general fixed assets, required by 
generally accepted accounting principles, is not included in this financial 
report. 

In our opinion, except that the omission of the financial statements 
described above results in an incomplete presentation, as explained in the 
preceding paragraph, the combined financial statements referred to above 
present fairly the financial position of the Pittsfield School District as 
at June 30, 1984 and the results of its operations for the year then ended, 
in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a 
basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

Our examination was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the 
combined financial statements taken as a whole. The supporting schedules 
listed in the index are presented for the purposes of additional analysis 
and are not a required part of the combined financial statements of the 
Pittsfield School District. The information has been subjected to the 
auditing procedures applied in the examination of the combined financial 
statements and, in our opinion, is fairly stated in all material respects 
in relation to the combined financial statements taken as a whole. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jon R. Lang 








T 



Certified Public Accountant 

MASON & RICH PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 

Accountants and Auditors 



- 93 - 



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- 96 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



NOTE 1 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

The accounting policies of the Pittsfield School District conform to 
generally accepted accounting principles as applicable to governmental units, 
except as indicated below. The following is a summary of the more significant 
pol icies: 

A. Basis of Presentation 

The accounts of the School District are organized on the basis of 
funds or account groups, each of which is considered a separate 
accounting entity. The operations of each fund are accounted for with 
a separate set of self-balancing accounts that comprise its assets, 
liabilities, equities, revenues and expenditures or expenses. The 
various funds are grouped by type in the financial statements. The 
following fund types and account groups are used by the School Dis- 
trict: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

(1) General Fund - The General Fund is the general operating fund of 
the school district. All general appropriations and other receipts 
that are not allocated by law or contractual agreement to another fund 
are accounted for in this fund. From the fund are paid the general 
operating expenditures, the fixed charges, and the capital improvement 
costs that are not paid through other funds. 

(2) Special Revenue Funds - Special revenue funds are used to account 
for the proceeds of specific revenue sources Cother than expendable 
trust, or major capital projects) requiring separate accounting because 
of legal or regulatory provisions or administrative action. The funds 
included in this group are the Food Service, Federal Projects and 
Drake Field Funds. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

(4) Agency Funds - Agency Funds are used to account for assets held by 
the School District as an agent for individuals, private organizations, 
other governmental units and/or other funds. The High School Activity 
Fund is reported as an Agency Fund. 

Agency Funds are custodial in nature (assets equals liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 



(Continued) 



- 97 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

(Continued) 



ACCOUNT GROUPS 

The accounting and reporting treatment applied to the fixed assets 
and long-term liabilities associated with a fund are determined by its 
measurement focus. All governmental funds are accounted for on a 
spending or "financial flow" measurement focus. This means that only 
current assets and current liabilities are generally included on their 
balance sheets. Their reported fund balance (net current assets) is 
considered a measure of "available spendable resources." Governmental 
fund operating statements present increases (revenues and other financ- 
ing sources) and decreases (expenditures and other financing uses) in 
net current assets. Accordingly, they are said to present a summary of 
sources and uses of "available spendable resources" during a period. 

General Long-Term Obligation Account Group - Long-terra liabilities 
expected to be financed from governmental funds are accounted for in 
the General Long-Term Obligation Account Group, not in the governmental 
funds . 

The account group is not a "fund." It is concerned only with the 
measurement of financial position. It is not involved with measurement 
of results of operations. 

Because of their spending measurement focus, expenditure recogni- 
tion for governmental fund types is limited to exclude amounts repre- 
sented by noncurrent liabilities. Since they do not affect net assets, 
such long-terra amounts are not recognized as governmental fund type 
expenditures or fund liabilities. They are instead reported as liabil- 
ities in the General Long-Term Obligation Account Group. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

Basis of accounting refers to when revenues and expenditures or 
expenses are recognized in the accounts and reported in the financial 
statements. Basis of accounting relates to the timing of the measure- 
ments made, regardless of the measurement focus applied. 

All Governmental Funds are accounted for using the modified 
accrual basis of accounting. Their revenues are recognized when they 
become measurable and available as net current assets. 






(Continued) 



- 98 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

(Continued) 



Expenditures are generally recognized under the modified accrual 
basis of accounting when the related fund liability is incurred. 
Exceptions to this general rule include: (1) accumulated unpaid vaca- 
tion, sick pay and other employee amounts which are not accrued; and 
(2) principal and interest on general long-term debt which is recog- 
nized when due. 

C. Inventories/Reserve for Inventories 

Only the food service program (Special Revenue) records invento- 
ries. The food service program records inventories of food supplies at 
cost on a first-in, first-out basis. The cost is reported as an 
expenditure at the time of purchase. Reported inventories are equally 
offset by a fund balance reserve which indicates that they do not 
constitute available spendable resources. 

D. Accumulated Unpaid Employee Benefits 

Teachers and principals may accumulate up to 90 days of sick 
leave, all others may accumulate up to 45 days, but are not entitled to 
lump sura cash payment. 

The School District does not accrue accumulated unpaid vacation or 
sick leave in the General Fund, but rather records these costs at the 
time the payments are made. Accumulated unpaid sick leave at June 30, 
1984 was approximately $129,946. 

Statement 4 of the NCGA requires that the current and non-current 
portions of sick pay liabilities be reported on the governmental fund 
and general long-terra obligation account group balance sheets 
respectively. As the amount of current and non-current sick pay cannot 
be reasonably estimated, no liabilities have been recorded in the 
balance sheets of either fund. 

E. Budgetary Accounting, Encumbrances and Reserve for Encumbranc e 

General governmental revenues and expenditures accounted for in 
budgetary funds are controlled by a formal integrated budgetary 
accounting system in accordance with various legal requirements which 
govern the School District's operations. 

Encumbrance accounting, under which purchase orders, contracts, 
and other commitments for the expenditure of funds are recorded in 
order to reserve that portion of the applicable appropriation, is 
employed in the governmental funds. Encumbrances outstanding at year 
end are reported as reservations of fund balance since they do not yet 
constitute expenditures or liabilities. There were no outstanding 
encumbrances at June 30, 1984. 

(Continued) 



- 99 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

(Continued) 



F. Appropriations from Town 

The Town of Pittsfield collects School District taxes as part of 
local property tax assessments. The Town is required to pay over to 
the School District its share of property tax assessments through 
periodic payments based on projected cash flow requirements of the 
District. The Town assumes financial responsibility for all uncollect- 
ed property taxes. 

G. Total Columns (Memorandum Only) on Combined Statements 

Total columns on the Combined Statements are captioned Memorandum 
Only to indicate that they are presented only to facilitate financial 
analysis. Data in these columns do not present financial position, 
results of operations, or changes in financial position in conformity 
with generally accepted accounting principles. Neither is such data 
comparable to a consolidation. Interfund eliminations have not been 
made in the aggregation of this data. 

H. General Fixed Assets 

General fixed assets have been acquired for general governmental 
purposes and have been recorded as expenditures in the fund making the 
expenditure. These expenditures are required to be capitalized at 
historical cost in the General Fixed Asset Group of Accounts for 
accountability purposes. In accordance with practices followed by 
other municipal entities in the State, the District does not maintain a 
record of its general fixed assets and accordingly, a statement of 
general fixed assets, required by generally accepted accounting princi- 
ples, is not included in this financial report. 



NOTE 2 - LONG-TERM DEBT 

All bonded debt is recorded in the general long-terra obligation account 
group. As the School District is an agency of the Town of Pittsfield, the bonds 
bear the full faith and credit of the town. As the debt comes due the School 
District remits the payments to the appropriate depository. There were no 
long-terra notes or bonds outstanding during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1984. 

At the District meeting March 22, 1984, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate $375,000 for alterations and renovations to the Pittsfield High 
School. The funds are to be raised by issuance of bonds or notes. No funds had 
been raised through June 30, 1984 and $8,359 had been advanced by the General 
Fund for expenditures to June 30. 

(Continued) 



- 100 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

(Continued) 



NOTE 3 - RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

Only teachers and principals are members of the New Hampshire Retirement 
System. Under this plan, participants contribute annually a percentage of 
compensation which is fixed by law. The District's contribution rate for normal 
cost of the plan is based upon an -actuarial valuation of the entire State plan. 
The amount, if any, of the excess of vested benefits over pension fund assets for 
the Pittsfield School District is not available. The District has no past 
service cost obligation. The total pension cost to the District for the year was 
$3,073. 



NOTE 4 - INDIVIDUAL FUND INTERFUND RECEIVABLES AND PAYABLES 
The balances at June 30, 1984 were: 



Fund 

General 

Special Revenue: 
Food Service 
Drake Field 

Capital Project 

Agency Fund 
Totals 



NOTE 5 - BUDGETED FUND BALANCE 

The $13,581 excess of budgeted expenditures over revenues on Exhibit C 
represents the amount of beginning fund balance voted to reduce taxes. 



Interfund 


Int 


:erfund 


Receivable 


Pa 


tyable 


$ 45,358 


$ 


24,896 


- 




9,310 


6,350 




773 


- 




8,000 


- 


$ 


8,729 


$ 51,708 


51,708 



- 101 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
GENERAL FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES COMPARED TO BUDGET 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Schedule 1 



Budget 



Actual 



Actual 
Over (Under) 



District Assessments 

Intergovernmental Revenues 
Sweepstakes 
Building Aid 
Driver Education 
Special Education 
Foundation Aid 

Area Vocational Transporat ion 
Total Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 
Tuition - Regular Day 

Miscellaneous Revenues 
Trust Funds 
Other 

Total Miscellaneous 

Total Revenues 

Fund Balance Used to Reduce Taxes 

Total Budget 



$1 


,020,280 


$1 


,020,280 $ 


— 




10,552 




10,552 


mm 




- 




203 


203 




4,500 




4,000 


(500) 




54,916 




54,916 


- 




79,589 




79,589 


- 




24,880 




28,440 


3,560 




174,437 




177,700 


3,263 




234,000 




265,781 


31,781 




42,350 




42,953 


603 




15,500 




17,652 


2,152 




57,850 




60,605 


2,755 


1 


,486,567 
13,581 


$1 


,524,366 $ 


3 7,79 9 










$1 


,500,148 









- 102 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
GENERAL FUND 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES COMPARED TO BUDGET 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Schedule 2 



Instruction 
Regular Programs 
Special Education Programs 
Other Programs 

Total Instruction 

Pupil Services 
Attendance and Social Work 
Guidance 
Health 

Speech Pathology and Audiology 
Total Pupil Services 

Instructional Staff Services 
Improvement of Instruction 
Educational Media 

Total Instructional Staff Services 

General Administration 

School Administrative Unit 

School Administration Expenses 

Business Services 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant 
Pupil Transportation 

Total Business Services 

Block Grant 

Total Expenditures 



Budget 



$ 720,564 

202,347 

66,906 

989,817 



50,654 



7,048 
32,451 



39 


,499 


7 


,905 


50 


,891 


136 


,787 



173,979 

43,685 

217,664 



6,931 



Actual 



701,605 

207,387 

58,830 

967,822 



Actual 
O ver (Under ) 

$ (18,959) 
5,040 
(8,076 ) 
(21,995) 



1,540 


1,378 


(162) 


30,818 


23,914 


(6,904) 


17,650 


17,091 


(559) 


646 


634 


(12) 



43,017 



4,891 



27 


,205 


32 


,096 


7 


,226 


51, 


,352 


149 


,023 



186,326 

55,937 

242,263 



(7,637 ) 



(2,157) 
(5,246 ) 
(7,403) 



(679) 



461 



12,236 



12,347 
12,252 



24,599 



(6,931 ) 



$1,500,148 $1,492,799 $ (7,349 ) 



- 103 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
COMBINING BALANCE SHEET 
ALL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 
JUNE 30, 1984 



Schedule 3 



Assets 
Cash 
Due from Other Funds: 

From General Fund 
Due from Other Governments 
Inventory 



Food 

Service 

Fund 

$ 17,422 



6,960 
494 



Drake 
Field 



6,350 



Total 

$ 17,422 

6,350 

6,960 

494 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 24,876 $ 6,350 $ 31 ,226 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 
Liabil it ies 
Accounts Payable 
Due to Other Funds: 
To General Fund 
Total Liabilities 
Fund Balances 
Reserved for Inventory 
Unreserved 
Total Fund Balances 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 



$ 3,078 $ 





9,310 


12,388 


494 
11 ,994 


12,488 


s 


24,876 



377 
773 



1,150 



5,200 



5,200 



$ 3,455 



10,083 
13,538 



494 
17,194 
17,688 



$ 6,350 $ 31 ,226 



- 104 - 



Schedule 4 

PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Food 
Service Drake 



Fund Field Total 



Revenues 

Intergovernmental Revenues $ 32,356 $ $ 32,356 

Charges for Services 70,518 - 70,518 

Other Revenues - 8,877 8,877 

Total Revenues 102,874 8,877 111 ,751 

Expenditures 
Business Services: 

Operation of Plant - 4,901 4,901 

Food Services 105 ,844 - 105,844 

Total Expenditures 105,844 4,901 110,745 

Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures (2,970) 3,976 1,006 

Other Financing Sources 
Increase (Decrease) in Inventory (501) - (501) 

Excess of Revenues and Other Sources Over 

Expenditures (3,471) 3,976 505 

Fund Balances, July 1, 1983 15,959 1,224 17,183 

Fund Balances, June 30, 1984 $ 12,488 $ 5,200 $ 17,688 



- 105 - 



Schedule 5 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
FOOD SERVICE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Revenues 
Intergovernmental 

Federal and State Reimbursement 
Charges for Services 
Lunches and Milk 
Snack Bar 

Total Charges for Services 

Total Revenues 



$ 26,741 
43,777 



$ 32,356 



70,518 



102,874 



Expc.idl tures 
Food 

Supplies 
Labor 
Other 

Total Expenditures 

Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures 



57,430 
2,366 

39,806 
6,242 



105,844 



(2,970) 



Other Financing Sources 
(Decrease) in Reserve for Inventory 

Fund Balance, July 1, 1983 

Fund Balance, June 30, 1984 



(501) 



15,959 



$ 12,488 



- 106 - 



Schedule 6 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
ALL AGENCY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1984 



Assets 
Cash 



Balance Balance 

July 1 , June 30, 

1983 Additions Deductions 1984 



$ 27,314 $ 77,154 $ 78,717 $ 25,751 



Liabi 1 it ies 
Due to Student Groups 
Due to General Fund 



$ 12,243 $ 58,914 $ 54,135 $ 17,022 
15,071 18,240 24,582 8,729 



Total Liabilities 



$ 27,314 $ 77,154 $ 78,717 $ 25,751 



, 



- 107 - 







asoth 
iclft 



'Pi vfcssional^ Assoc ia tion 



IHtSAIJJ I MAMiS. P.A 

JO\ l< M\(>. CI' A 
THOMAS I MAK&H. C.I' A 



TTILU'HOSI IhO.i TI\ i'Oitu 

ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS cahhigais cxtMstoss 

241 SOUTH MAIS STKi / J" 
COSl.OKI) Nl'M HAMISHIHI oi.llil 



AUCI I' RICH. C.P.A. 
MIU I Ail U. LULL CI' A 

UAll'll P. SaiMITT. (PA. 
.IOH\ I I YFOKH r.r.A 



September 12, 1984 



Pittsfield School District 
Pittsfield, New Hampshire 03263 



We have examined the financial statements of the Pittsfield School District 
for the year ended June 30, 1984, and have issued our report thereon dated 
September 12, 1984. As part of our examination, we made a study and 
evaluation of the School District's system of internal accounting control to 
the extent we considered necessary to evaluate the system as required by 
generally accepted auditing standards. The purpose of our study and 
evaluation was to determine the nature, timing and extent of the auditing 
procedures necessary for expressing an opinion on the School District's 
financial statements. Our study and evaluation was more limited than would 
be necessary to express an opinion on the system of internal accounting 
control taken as a whole. 

The management of the School District is responsible for establishing and 
maintaining a system of internal accounting control. In fulfilling this 
responsibility, estimates and judgments by management are required to assess 
the expected benefits and related costs of control procedures. The objec- 
tives of a system are to provide management with reasonable, but not abso- 
lute, assurance that assets are safeguarded against loss from unauthorized 
use or disposition, and that transactions are executed in accordance with 
management* 8 authorization and recorded properly to permit the preparation of 
financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting princi- 
ples. 

Because of inherent limitations in any system of internal accounting control, 
errors or irregularities may nevertheless occur and not be detected. Also, 
projection of any evaluation of the system to future periods is subject to 
the risk that procedures may become inadequate because of changes in condi- 
tions or that the degree of compliance with the procedures may deteriorate. 



- 108 - 



Pittsfield School District September 12, 1984 



Our study and evaluation made for the limited purpose described in the first 
paragraph would not necessarily disclose all material weaknesses in the 
system. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on the system of internal 
accounting control of the Pittsfield School District taken as a whole. 

We would be pleased to discuss the comments and recommendations attached with 
you should you so desire. According to the School District management all of 
these recommendations have been subsequently, or are in the process of, being 
implemented or being given further study. 

This report is intended solely for the use of management of Pittsfield School 
District, Pittsfield, New Hampshire, and the cognizant audit agency and other 
federal audit agencies and should not be used for any other purpose. 

Respectfully submitted, 



von R. Lang 



r 



>g 

Certified Public Accountant 

MASON & RICH PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 

Accountants and Auditors 



- 109 - 



(1) Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Significant internal accounting controls - 

Cash Receipts - Segregation of duties, prompt recording and depositing and 
bonding of employees handling cash. 

Cash Disbursements - Segregation of duties, control over unused, returned 
and voided checks, monthly reconciliation of bank accounts, authorization for 
payment and cancellation of invoices. 

We have evaluated all of the internal accounting controls in foregoing 
paragraph. We found no material weaknesses. 



(2) Purchasing and Receiving 

Significant accounting controls: bid process procedures, use of 
pre-numbered orders, and segregation of duties. 

We have evaluated the internal controls in the preceding sentence. No 
material weaknesses were found. 



(3) Accounts Payable 

Significant internal accounting controls: control established over 
incoming invoices, segregation of duties, authorized payment, review of 
vouchers to check that proper procedures were followed, and program charged 
checked against budget. 

We have evaluated the internal accounting controls in the preceding 
sentence. No material weaknesses were noted. 



(4) Payroll 

Significant internal accounting controls: segregation of duties, written 
personnel policies, payroll charges to approved budget, and wages paid at or 
above Federal minimum wage. 

We have evaluated the internal controls identified in the preceding 
paragraph. No material weaknesses were noted. 



- 110 - 



(5) Property and Equipment 

Significant internal controls: authorization for capital expenditures and 
detailed records of general and federal projects fund fixed assets. 

Material Weaknesses 

A. General Fixed Assets - Records are kept as required for purchases of 
fixed assets with federal funds. However, a record of other general fixed 
assets is not maintained so as to provide reporting in the financial state- 
ments . 

Recommendat ion - Detailed records of general fixed assets should be 
maintained. The School District should have a well defined policy to govern 
accounting for capital additions as opposed to maintenance and repairs. 
Subsidiary records for individual general fixed assets should include when 
possible the following information: (1) major asset class; (2) function 
and activity; (3) reference to acquisition source document; (4) acquisition 
date; (5) name and address of vendor; (6) short description of asset; (7) 
location; (8) fund and account from which purchased; (9) method of acquisition; 
(10) estimated useful life; (11) estimated salvage value; (12) date, method and 
authorization of disposition; and (13) replacement value. Periodic physical 
inventories should be conducted to test the accuracy of such records. The 
foregoing would enable the School Administrative Unit to report the general 
fixed assets on the financial statements. 

Management's Comments - Inventories of school equipment are revised 
annually before the end of June. The time consuming process of valuing the 
inventory and the capitalizing and depreciation of assets does not justify the 
time and effort required to maintain them. Management believes that this 
position is consistent with the position taken by other School Districts in New 
Hampshire. 



GENERAL: 



I. Student Activity Funds - Transactions in the student activity fund include 
(1) receipts of funds representing district revenue, (2) expenditures of funds 
advanced by the district for budgeted district expenditures, and (3) receipts 
and expenditures for class activities. 



- Ill - 



II. 


District 


Funds 


Material Weaknesses 


1. 


District 


Revenues 



Finding - Receipts representing district revenues are not turned over to 
the district treasurer promptly. Expenditures and transfers to other funds 
have apparently been made from these receipts. 

Recommendations - District funds received include such items as admissions 
to athletic events, driver education tuition, gym rentals and vending machine 
receipts. Receipts of such funds should be turned over to the treasurer 
intact. There should be no expenditures or transfers to other activities from 
district fund revenues. Expenditures made for these purposes should be 
provided for in the budget. 

Management's Comments - All district funds received in the activities funds 
will be turned over to the district treasurer and recorded in the district 
records . 



2. District Budgeted Funds 

Material Weakness 

Finding - Balances of district budgeted expenditure accounts were not 
turned back to the district treasurer at year end. Transfers were made among 
the district budget accounts and to other activity accounts. We noted that 
monthly reports of balances of funds have been made. 

Recommendation - At the end of the school year, and before June 30, the 
balances in these accounts should be turned back to the district. The balances 
should be monitored carefully so as to preclude overdrafts of any item. If it 
is anticipated there are insufficient funds in any item to meet expected 
expenditures, a request for an additional advance should be addressed to the 
board. Transfers between accounts should be permitted. This will provide the 
Board with better budgetary control. 

The monthly reports received presented fund balances only. It is suggested 
that the reports show beginning balances, receipts, expenditures and ending 
balances. 

Management's Comments - Balances remaining in the district budgeted 
accounts will be returned to the district treasurer as close to June 30 as 
possible. 



- 112 - 



'£\~ Jpryessi 



vssionaiybsociation 



TELEPHONE (603) 224-2000 

ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS cahrigain commons 

244 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DONALD F MASON. PA. CONCORD. NEW HAMPSHIRE 03301 

JON R LANG. C PA. 
THOMAS L. MARSH. C.P.A. 



ALICE P RICH. C.P.A. 
MICHAEL G LULL. C.P.A. 
RALPH P. SCHMITT. C.P.A 
JOHN E LYFORD. C PA 



September 12, 1984 



Pittsfield School District 
Pittsfield, New Hampshire 03263 

We have examined the combined financial statements of the Pittsfield School 
District, as of and for the year ended June 30, 1984, and have issued our report 
thereon dated September 12, 1984. Our examination was made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards; the provisions of Standards for Audit of 
Governmental Organizations , Programs , Activities and Functions , promulgated by 
the U.S. comptroller general, as they pertain to financial and compliance 
audits; the provisions of the Office of Management and Budget's (0MB) Uniform 
Requirements for Grants to State and Local Governments - Compliance Supplement 
(revised December 1982) (the approved compliance supplement); except as described 
in the following paragraphs, provisions of 0MB' s Circular A-102, Uniform 
Administrative Requirements for Grants-in-Aide to State and Local Governments , 
Attachment P, Audit Requirements , and the Guidelines for Financial and Compliance 
Audits of Federal ly Assisted Programs and, accordingly, included such tests of 
the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as we considered 
necessary in the circumstances. 

Based on our examination, we found that, for the items tested, the Pittsfield 
School District complied with the material terms and conditions of the federal 
award agreements. Further, based on our examination and the procedures referred 
to above, nothing came to our attention to indicate that the Pittsfield School 
District had not complied with the significant compliance terms and conditions of 
the awards referred to above. 

This report is intended solely for the use of the Pittsfield School District, the 
cognizant audit agency, and other federal and state audit agencies and should not 
be used for any other purpose. 

!8pectivelr) submitted, 






ion R. Lang 

Certified Public Accountant 
MASON & RICH PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 
Accountants and Auditors 



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- 116 - 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #51 

Pittsfield School District 
1984 - 1985 
ENROLLMENT 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Grade 1 

Grade 2 



Resident 


Tuition 


Total 


55 





55 


22 





22 



77 



77 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
Grade 2 
Grade 3 
Grade 4 



22 
43 
43 

ToT 



22 
43 
43 

ToT 



Grand Total Elementary 1-4 = 185 



- 117 - 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #51 
PITTSFIELD MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL 
1984 - 85 
ENROLLMENT 



MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL 
Grade 5 
Grade 6 
Grade 7 
Grade 8 
Grade 9 
Grade 10 
Grade 11 
Grade 12 

TOTAL 

GRAND TOTAL MIDDLE SCHOOL 

GRAND TOTAL HIGH SCHOOL 



RESIDENT 


TUITION 


TOTA] 


32 





32 


55 





55 


59 


1 


60 


46 





46 


41 


21 


62 


30 


33 


63 


55 


21 


76 


hi 


20 


61_ 


359 


96 


455 


192 


1 


193 


167 


95 


262 



- 118 - 



(original) 
TENTATIVE WARRANT 

THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Pittsfield 
qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the TOWN HALL in said District 
on the twelfth day of March, 1985 at 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon 
to act upon the following subjects: 

1. To choose a Moderator for the ensuing year; 

2. To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year; 

3. To choose two Members of the School Board for the 
ensuing three years; 

4. To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year. 

Voting will be by official, ballot and checklist. The polls will 
remain open 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM. Absentee voting will be allowed 
at this election. 

THE PITTSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD 

Thomas E. Marston, Chairman 
Edward G. Young, Vice-Chairman 
Sally Bartels 
John Gene st 
Arthur Morse 



- 119 - 



(original) 
TENTATIVE WARRANT 
THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Pittsfield 
qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the GREENLEAF AUDITORIUM in said 
District on the 14th day of March, 1985 at 8:00 o'clock in the 
evening to act upon the following subjects: 

ARTICLE I. 



To receive the reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees and 
Officers of the District and to pass any vote relating thereto. 

ARTICLE II. 



To determine and appoint the salaries of the School Board and 
Truant Officer, and fix the compensation of any other officers or 
agents of the District. 

ARTICLE III. 






To see what sum of money the District will vote to raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools, for the salaries of school 
district officers, employees and agents, and for the payment of 
statutory obligations of the District. 

ARTICLE IV. 

To see if the District will authorize the School Board to make 
application for and receive in the name of the District such funds 
as may be available from any source, and to authorize the School 
Board to expend such funds in accord with the provisions of 
RSA 198:20-b (Supp.). 

ARTICLE V. 



To transact any other business which may legally come before 
this meeting. 

THE PITTSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD 

Thomas E. Mars ton, Chairman 
Edward G. Young, Vice-Chairman 
Sally Bartels 
John Gene st 
Arthur Morse 



- 120 - 



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- 121 - 



PITTSFIELD SCHOOL BUDGET 



SECTION II 
REVENUES & CREDITS 





School 


Budget 


Approved 


Board's 


Committee 


Budget 


Budget 


Recommended 


1984-85 


1985-86 


1985-86 


59,811 






106,943 


106,943 


106,943 


10,980 


10,980 


10,980 


25,600 


28,440 


28,440 


4,500 


4,000 


4,000 


66,522 


66,522 


66,522 


6,897 


6,897 


6,897 



Unreserved Fund Balance 
Revenue From State Sources 
Foundation Aid 
Sweepstakes 

Area Vocational School 
Driver Education 
Handicapped Aid 
Catastrophic Aid 

R evenue From Federal Source 
Child Nutrition Program 

Local Revenue Other Than Taxes 

Tuition 

Bond Proceeds 

Pupil Activities 

Student Payments 

Trust Funds 

Food Program 

Rentals 

TOTAL SCHOOL REVENUES & CREDITS 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 

TOTAL REVENUES & 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 



28,500 



32,500 



248,000 


262,500 


375,000 


- 


2,000 


2,000 


9,000 


6,000 


52,700 


50,800 


90,477 


95,744 


5,500 


5,500 


1,092,430 


678,826 


1,073,259 


1,505,286 


2,165,689 


2,184,112 



32,500 

262,500 

2,000 

6,000 

50,800 

95,744 

5,500 

678,826 
1,505,286 

2,184,112 



- 122 - 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #51 

ALTON - BARNSTEAD - PITTSFIELD 



PITTSFIELD 

1985-86 SCHOOL CALENDAR 



M 



W Th 



JANUARY 



M T W Th F 
27 28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 
(19 days) 



OCTOBER 
(21 days) 



X W 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

X 15 16 17 W 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 3 4 5 6 7 

(14 days) 10 11 12 13 14 

W 18 19 20 21 

X X X X X 



MARCH 
(21 days) 



3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 



17 
24 
31 



18 19 20 21 
25 26 27 28 



NOVEMBER 
(16 days) 



APRIL 
(19 days) 





First 


Quarter 


46 


Days 






X 


12 


13 


14 


15 






18 


19 


20 


21 


W 






25 


26 


X 


X 


X 




DECEMBER 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


MAY 


(15 days) 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


(19 days) 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


X 










JANUARY 






X 


2 


3 


JUNE 


(22 days) 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


(14 days) 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 






20 


21 


22 


23 


24 






Second 


Quarter 


42 


Days 





Third Quarter 44 Days 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

XXX 

X X 

5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 

19 20 21 22 23 

26 27 28 29 X 

2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 W 

23 24 25 26 27 

Fourth Quarter 48 Days 



Calendar Notes 

1. X = No School 

2. W = Workshops for Teachers — Students Off 

3. 190 Calendar Days Scheduled: 180 School Days (Required) 

1st & 2nd Quarter = 88 Days 
3rd & 4th Quarter = 92 Days 
5 Workshop Day 
5 Snow Days 

4. Required Holidays — (RSA 288:4): November 11, Veterans' Day 

May 30, Memorial Day 

SPECIAL NOTE: Students enrolled at the Regional Vocational Education 
Center in Concord or Wolfeboro, must attend when the 
center is in session. 



- 123 -